MY N600 UPDATE INFORMATION

Hopefully not. Am not sure why would they denied your N600 app, good moral character only for the N400 app so don't worry about your background with the law. My step brother went to prison did 3 years almost got deported until they realized he derived citizenship. They gave him the cert of citizenship for free in prison.
Jason I'm happy for you and to hear your success with immigration has given me hope. May I ask you a few questions about your step brother process? My fiance may in the same situtation.
 
Hi guys! I recently came to the US to apply for my passport since the consulate denied my application stating that I did not derive citizenship through my father since I only obtained my green card one month prior to my birthday. However, I knew I had the right and when I applied at Boston Passport Agency, I obtained my passport in only ONE day! (since I had proof of international travel within one week, I was able to apply through a passport agency). So, if there is anybody else out there experiencing difficulties with their consulate, do not give up! If you do meet the requirements regardless of the timeline, you did derive citizenship!
 

NJN400

Registered Users (C)
Hi guys! I recently came to the US to apply for my passport since the consulate denied my application stating that I did not derive citizenship through my father since I only obtained my green card one month prior to my birthday. However, I knew I had the right and when I applied at Boston Passport Agency, I obtained my passport in only ONE day! (since I had proof of international travel within one week, I was able to apply through a passport agency). So, if there is anybody else out there experiencing difficulties with their consulate, do not give up! If you do meet the requirements regardless of the timeline, you did derive citizenship!
Congratulations. Now Uncle Sam will chase you down forever unless you pay him taxes :)
 
Hey. I filed my N600 application my father is a US citizen and im 19 years old my application was received Jan 3 and transferred to my local office on Jan 24 i have not heard from them since then what should i be expecting. Thanks in advance
 
Hey. I filed my N600 application my father is a US citizen and im 19 years old my application was received Jan 3 and transferred to my local office on Jan 24 i have not heard from them since then what should i be expecting. Thanks in advance
Keep waiting, as it has only been a couple weeks.
For my son's application I applied Jan 27 last year and only got the certificate May 13th.
 
ALso, try to check the processing times for your center. (Choose the field office that your application is at).
Looks like the wait times are longer now. Mine was Seattle, WA and it took 4 months at this time last year, but current processing times show closer to 7 months now!!! (they are only processing cases from July/16 right now in Feb/17)

CLICK - https://egov.uscis.gov/cris/processTimesDisplayInit.do > select field office from drop down menu
 
Hello.
I came to the US when I was 8 months old. I received my green card upon entry at the airport. My father was in Vietnam for 2 years,and was married to my mom who was in the US,and also had a greencard. My father naturalized March 8th 1971 and I was born on November26 1970. My father was in Vietnam War fighting for the US Army when I was born.
My mom and dad were married before i was born,and are married to this day. My mom,naturalized in 2002 . She always had a US passport.
I lived ,and went to school in the US. I left the US when I was 26,
( 2months from my 27th birthday) I went to Trinidad( my birth country) and got married. Do I qualify for derivedcitizenship? Thank you,in advance.
Please,tell me there is SOME sort of hope!
 
Hello.
I came to the US when I was 8 months old. I received my green card upon entry at the airport. My father was in Vietnam for 2 years,and was married to my mom who was in the US,and also had a greencard. My father naturalized March 8th 1971 and I was born on November26 1970. My father was in Vietnam War fighting for the US Army when I was born.
My mom and dad were married before i was born,and are married to this day. My mom,naturalized in 2002 . She always had a US passport.
I lived ,and went to school in the US. I left the US when I was 26,
( 2months from my 27th birthday) I went to Trinidad( my birth country) and got married. Do I qualify for derivedcitizenship? Thank you,in advance.
Please,tell me there is SOME sort of hope!
Both parents would have to be a citizen before you turn 18.
 
Been following and reading this forum thread a bit now. Wanted to share some info on a friend's case I assisted with. Her father was born in Texas, raised in California. He married a Mexican citizen in Texas in 1992. My friend was then born in Mexico in 1993. She lived there with mother until age three then they moved to California. She was raised in California. Her parents then had two more daughters born in California. She graduated high school and was told that since she didn't have proof of citizenship that she'd have to pay out of state tuition, so she had to forego attending a four year school right out of high school despite being admitted to all the places she applied. They consulted an attorney who helped get her mother and her's status as permanent residents in 2012 - never telling her and her parents that there is a separate process for her since her father is and has always been a US citizen and her parents were married (in the US) before she was born. They paid for permanent resident filings and it so happened that in California AB540 allowed her to attend University at instate rates (even if it was still insanely expensive but I digress). We met and I learned of her situation and found it odd since the US constitution allows for citizenship by birth to a US parent so I began researching and let her know. She finally mustered up enough gumption to feel that it would be safe to apply for N600 given the current political climate against Mexican immigrants. I helped prepare the N600 and fee waiver.

We included in N600
her father's original birth certificate,
his California school transcripts (to prove that he had lived in the US for at least 5 years prior to her birth),
a copy of the parents' marriage certificate from Texas,
her original birth certificate from Mexico,
a photocopy her California high school diploma,
community college Associate's certificates, and
a copy of her university Bachelor's degree (a University of California student),
a photocopy of her green card, and
a photocopy of her mother's green card.
For the fee waiver, we submitted a letter from Medi-Cal.

Timeline: Sent via USPS certified mail with return receipt on May 2, arrived to USCIS-Phoenix lockbox on May 5. Notice issued on May 21st that fee waiver was approved. It was then transferred to USCIS National Benefits Center on May 22. As of today, USCIS case status online says N600 was received on June 6.

Can anyone shed light on where the case may go next?
 

newacct

Well-Known Member
Been following and reading this forum thread a bit now. Wanted to share some info on a friend's case I assisted with. Her father was born in Texas, raised in California. He married a Mexican citizen in Texas in 1992. My friend was then born in Mexico in 1993. She lived there with mother until age three then they moved to California. She was raised in California. Her parents then had two more daughters born in California. She graduated high school and was told that since she didn't have proof of citizenship that she'd have to pay out of state tuition, so she had to forego attending a four year school right out of high school despite being admitted to all the places she applied. They consulted an attorney who helped get her mother and her's status as permanent residents in 2012 - never telling her and her parents that there is a separate process for her since her father is and has always been a US citizen and her parents were married (in the US) before she was born. They paid for permanent resident filings and it so happened that in California AB540 allowed her to attend University at instate rates (even if it was still insanely expensive but I digress). We met and I learned of her situation and found it odd since the US constitution allows for citizenship by birth to a US parent so I began researching and let her know. She finally mustered up enough gumption to feel that it would be safe to apply for N600 given the current political climate against Mexican immigrants. I helped prepare the N600 and fee waiver.

We included in N600
her father's original birth certificate,
his California school transcripts (to prove that he had lived in the US for at least 5 years prior to her birth),
a copy of the parents' marriage certificate from Texas,
her original birth certificate from Mexico,
a photocopy her California high school diploma,
community college Associate's certificates, and
a copy of her university Bachelor's degree (a University of California student),
a photocopy of her green card, and
a photocopy of her mother's green card.
For the fee waiver, we submitted a letter from Medi-Cal.

Timeline: Sent via USPS certified mail with return receipt on May 2, arrived to USCIS-Phoenix lockbox on May 5. Notice issued on May 21st that fee waiver was approved. It was then transferred to USCIS National Benefits Center on May 22. As of today, USCIS case status online says N600 was received on June 6.

Can anyone shed light on where the case may go next?
Why didn't she apply for a US passport first, which is much cheaper and faster?
 

SusieQQQ

Well-Known Member
Been following and reading this forum thread a bit now. Wanted to share some info on a friend's case I assisted with. Her father was born in Texas, raised in California. He married a Mexican citizen in Texas in 1992. My friend was then born in Mexico in 1993. She lived there with mother until age three then they moved to California. She was raised in California. Her parents then had two more daughters born in California. She graduated high school and was told that since she didn't have proof of citizenship that she'd have to pay out of state tuition, so she had to forego attending a four year school right out of high school despite being admitted to all the places she applied. They consulted an attorney who helped get her mother and her's status as permanent residents in 2012 - never telling her and her parents that there is a separate process for her since her father is and has always been a US citizen and her parents were married (in the US) before she was born. They paid for permanent resident filings and it so happened that in California AB540 allowed her to attend University at instate rates (even if it was still insanely expensive but I digress). We met and I learned of her situation and found it odd since the US constitution allows for citizenship by birth to a US parent so I began researching and let her know. She finally mustered up enough gumption to feel that it would be safe to apply for N600 given the current political climate against Mexican immigrants. I helped prepare the N600 and fee waiver.

We included in N600
her father's original birth certificate,
his California school transcripts (to prove that he had lived in the US for at least 5 years prior to her birth),
a copy of the parents' marriage certificate from Texas,
her original birth certificate from Mexico,
a photocopy her California high school diploma,
community college Associate's certificates, and
a copy of her university Bachelor's degree (a University of California student),
a photocopy of her green card, and
a photocopy of her mother's green card.
For the fee waiver, we submitted a letter from Medi-Cal.

Timeline: Sent via USPS certified mail with return receipt on May 2, arrived to USCIS-Phoenix lockbox on May 5. Notice issued on May 21st that fee waiver was approved. It was then transferred to USCIS National Benefits Center on May 22. As of today, USCIS case status online says N600 was received on June 6.

Can anyone shed light on where the case may go next?
Presumably the father did not register her birth with a CRBA?
Also you left out on what basis she returned to the US at age 3?
 
We didn't go for a US passport first since it was not as pressing as she has a green card (which was never really relevant seeing as she should have acquired citizenship at birth...) and in her mind, the proof of citizenship is permanent whereas the passport needs to be renewed, the whole process has to start from scratch proving citizenship for passport every time it needs to be renewed, whereas the proof of citizenship never expires and can be used easily for applying for passport in the future. And yes, correct SusieQQQ, her father was not made aware of the CBRA when she was born. They came to US when she was age 3, as do most, for better economic opportunity and her father had been in California ever since she was born traveling back and forth to visit she and her mom. She was admitted at age 3 since her dad was a US citizen... I guess no one informed then at that time of CRBA. These kinds of things happen too often to our southern brothers and sisters, especially if they don't come from economic advantaged backgrounds. Regardless. Once we are able to secure a proof of citizenship, US passport will come after.

I'm curious to know how long it all took in the end for Jackson muzak.
 

SusieQQQ

Well-Known Member
We didn't go for a US passport first since it was not as pressing as she has a green card (which was never really relevant seeing as she should have acquired citizenship at birth...) and in her mind, the proof of citizenship is permanent whereas the passport needs to be renewed, the whole process has to start from scratch proving citizenship for passport every time it needs to be renewed, whereas the proof of citizenship never expires and can be used easily for applying for passport in the future. And yes, correct SusieQQQ, her father was not made aware of the CBRA when she was born. They came to US when she was age 3, as do most, for better economic opportunity and her father had been in California ever since she was born traveling back and forth to visit she and her mom. She was admitted at age 3 since her dad was a US citizen... I guess no one informed then at that time of CRBA. These kinds of things happen too often to our southern brothers and sisters, especially if they don't come from economic advantaged backgrounds. Regardless. Once we are able to secure a proof of citizenship, US passport will come after.

I'm curious to know how long it all took in the end for Jackson muzak.
You still haven’t said on what status she was admitted at age 3. If it was as a child of citizen it was presumably as an LPR. If she was admitted as an LPR as a minor and resided with him, her usc parent, she automatically became a citizen back then already.

(Incidentally it would have to have been the usc father doing the crba, not southern brethren.)
 
She was admitted as an LPR who resided with father USC. But CBP didn't give any documentation at port of entry when she came at age 3 which would have made their lives much easier because when they got green card in 2012, they set her interview one month after 18th birthday (of course) which if before 18th bday would have granted automatic citizenship albeit via naturalization not via birthright.
 
Top