MY N600 UPDATE INFORMATION

Sm1smom

Super Moderator
Thanks again, do you have any idea why the application wasn't rejected when first received? Have heard that once illegible the app will be rejected but not received or transferred to local office. Please advise
Thanks
The people who receive the petition are not the ones who determine if the petition should be approved or denied. Their job is simply that of checking to see if a filed petition is complete - if the petition is complete it gets accepted and forwarded to the local office.
 

Sm1smom

Super Moderator
By the way next week my spouse made an appointment with local USCIS to find out if he should withdraw the N600 and apply N400 instead.

As you mentioned the N600 will be definitely denied so no point to wait for 13-18 minths. He rather file the N400 which takes only 12 months processing.

Thanks for your advices but my spouse really wanted to hear it also from the officer. I know you guys here are expert but nothing is guaranteed here unless more accurate from the USCIS.

P.S. we called the USCIS and we're were told that even the PP was denied somehow the N600 might be not. We were very confused so that why my spouse had to make an appointment with USCIS.
Actually, nothing is guaranteed from what whoever your spouse meets from the infopass appointment as that person will not be reviewing your spouse’s file while attending to him. The only real response will be whatever the IO in charge of the case file determines at the end of the process.
 

SusieQQQ

Well-Known Member
Thanks for input! The USCIS will refund the fee $1,125 once it is denied coz accepted by error or it is non refundable.

Thanks
It wasn’t accepted in error, it was filed in error. They still had to process it, that’s what you paid for.

Thanks again, do you have any idea why the application wasn't rejected when first received? Have heard that once illegible the app will be rejected but not received or transferred to local office. Please advise
Thanks
You heard wrong, if that was the case all the actual decision officers would be at place of first filing and the field offices would just be rubber stamping pre-approved applications, so actually pointless. If an application is complete on the face of it (all required forms submitted, correct fee etc) it gets “accepted” and forwarded to the local office for adjudication. You’re confusing “acceptance” with “approval”.
 

SusieQQQ

Well-Known Member
P.S. we called the USCIS and we're were told that even the PP was denied somehow the N600 might be not. We were very confused so that why my spouse had to make an appointment with USCIS.
You don’t seem to want to accept that he doesn’t meet the requirements! By all means continue until it gets adjudicated and you hear it officially, but be prepared for filing N400.
 
The N400 app was getting started filling up before the N600, he did online but at some point there were 2 warnings came up during he filling up.

1. You may already be USC
2. Selective Service

With above warnings the application itself didn't allow him to complete. Yeh he he should have had printed it off and manually complete it but at that time he had no idea what to do so ended up filing N600 instead. Now he realized that he is illegible for PP and N600.
 

Jbuff

Active Member
The N400 app was getting started filling up before the N600, he did online but at some point there were 2 warnings came up during he filling up.

1. You may already be USC
2. Selective Service

With above warnings the application itself didn't allow him to complete. Yeh he he should have had printed it off and manually complete it but at that time he had no idea what to do so ended up filing N600 instead. Now he realized that he is illegible for PP and N600.
Shouldve just sent in a regular application by mail.

That warning should be ignored if you know for sure you werent eligible under a parent!!

My father turned a citizen 2 weeks after my 18th birthday .

Both times when i applied for n400 i had to go though that. But i knew i wasnt eligible under him and made that clear to the IO.


Just accept the info you”ve been given here. File for N400 and do it the right way. Instead of paying almost double that price for N600 which will surely be denied and monies wasted!!
 
By the way next week my spouse made an appointment with local USCIS to find out if he should withdraw the N600 and apply N400 instead.

As you mentioned the N600 will be definitely denied so no point to wait for 13-18 minths. He rather file the N400 which takes only 12 months processing.

Thanks for your advices but my spouse really wanted to hear it also from the officer. I know you guys here are expert but nothing is guaranteed here unless more accurate from the USCIS.

P.S. we called the USCIS and we're were told that even the PP was denied somehow the N600 might be not. We were very confused so that why my spouse had to make an appointment with USCIS.
Sometimes, your claim to citizenship may be very complicated that the passport office can't really make a decision, and they would reject the application.

But in his case, it's pretty clear that he has no claim to citizenship (at least based on what you posted here), so there is no reason why N-600 would be approved (again, unless there were yet some relevant circumstances you have not told us about, or if USCIS mistakenly approves his application).

Oh, and nobody here is an expert (you would need a lawyer for expert advice), and we don't know the totality of the circumstances. Just make sure you are aware of that :)
 
Can you file an N-600 outside the United States. And what is the possibility of getting a citizenship certificate if you have never been in the United States before?
 
Depends on the situation. You might be able to file it with the local US embassy or consulate wherever you are living. Just make sure you are eligible for filing an N600 first otherwise it will be in vain. *** I am not a licensed attorney nor do I purport to be such.
 
i
Depends on the situation. You might be able to file it with the local US embassy or consulate wherever you are living. Just make sure you are eligible for filing an N600 first otherwise it will be in vain. *** I am not a licensed attorney nor do I purport to be such.
I think I am eligible. My father was a citizen before I was born. He spent at least 35 years in the United States. Lived in New Jersey, Virginia and New York. I'm twenty one now and would love to relocate to the United States. What situation would make them deny my N-600 application?
 
I would like to know if I am eligible to file for N400. I am already 40yrs old and a green card holder. My father got his US citizenship year 1980's then he petition me. I was 10 when I came here but never thought of applying for us passport nor I was automatically US citizen. Up to now I have been renewing my green card.
 

Jbuff

Active Member
I would like to know if I am eligible to file for N400. I am already 40yrs old and a green card holder. My father got his US citizenship year 1980's then he petition me. I was 10 when I came here but never thought of applying for us passport nor I was automatically US citizen. Up to now I have been renewing my green card.
Yes just show necessary proof. Get a US passport it's cheaper and faster.
 
What are the documents needed to apply for the passport. I really don’t want to pay over $1000 ‍♀️
Your Birth certificate. US birth certificate.
If u were born abroad, get your foreign birth certificate, your proof of citizenship like a certificate of birth abroad. If you don't have that and your parents were citizens - provided they fulfilled the criteria for transmitting citizenship, get their proof of citizenship, evidence of time spent abroad before your birth.
And then proof of their relationship to you, including marriage certificate.
If illegitimate you will need to prove that you were legitimated by citizen parent. Or that you had a strong parent to child relationship.
It'd not be easy getting the documents.
But hey, I just got mine!
 
I entered the USA in 96 , I applied for citizenship in 2014 and the official that conducted my interview said I was already a citizen, but he needed to verify with someone else. Like two weeks later, I get a letter that says I became i citizen in 96 and I could not be naturalized. Would this letter and my dad’s birth certificate be enough to apply for the passport?
 

newacct

Well-Known Member
I entered the USA in 96 , I applied for citizenship in 2014 and the official that conducted my interview said I was already a citizen, but he needed to verify with someone else. Like two weeks later, I get a letter that says I became i citizen in 96 and I could not be naturalized. Would this letter and my dad’s birth certificate be enough to apply for the passport?
I don't think so. You need to provide the same evidence you would provide to prove your citizenship for N-600, to prove your citizenship to apply for a US passport. The evidence that you would need to provide depends on if you acquired US citizenship at birth from your parent, or derived it after birth due to the naturalization of your parents. Can you provide more details?
 
I don't think so. You need to provide the same evidence you would provide to prove your citizenship for N-600, to prove your citizenship to apply for a US passport. The evidence that you would need to provide depends on if you acquired US citizenship at birth from your parent, or derived it after birth due to the naturalization of your parents. Can you provide more details?
I do have my dad’d Birth certificate , my birth certificate. Would that be enough? Or do I need something else? I have a question, in the question about the dates my father reside in the United States. Should I just put that he has always reside in hnited States or do I need the dates of the times he has been out of United States for work /pleasure?
 

newacct

Well-Known Member
I do have my dad’d Birth certificate , my birth certificate. Would that be enough? Or do I need something else? I have a question, in the question about the dates my father reside in the United States. Should I just put that he has always reside in hnited States or do I need the dates of the times he has been out of United States for work /pleasure?
I'm trying to figure out how you would have gotten US citizenship. Your father's physical presence in the US only matter if you are claiming to have been a US citizen from birth, because your US citizen parents met the conditions for transmitting US citizenship to a child born abroad at the time of your birth. If you are claiming citizenship based on that, you would need evidence your US citizen parent(s) meet the requirement for amount of physical presence in the US before your birth. However, if you were a US citizen from birth, then it would have been unlikely for them to have given you a green card.

If you weren't a US citizen from birth, the other way you could have gotten US citizenship automatically was as a permanent resident under 18 living in the US with a US citizen parent. Specifically, if at any time after February 27, 2001, you were a US permanent resident, under 18, living in the US with a US citizen parent (doesn't matter if it was before or after you became a permanent resident), you automatically became a citizen at that time. Before 2001, if both of your parents naturalized (or if your parents were divorced and the parent having sole custody naturalized, or one parent died and the other one naturalized) after you became a permanent resident and while you were under 18, or if one parent was a citizen when you were born and the other parent naturalized after you became a permanent resident while you were under 18, you automatically became a citizen. If you are claiming citizenship based on one of those cases, your father's physical presence in the US doesn't matter; rather, you need to show that your father was a citizen at a certain point in time when you were under 18 (e.g. a passport valid at that time or a Certificate of Naturalization before that time or a birth certificate showing birth in the US, etc.), and your green card or other evidence showing that you were a permanent resident at that time, and your birth certificate and parents' marriage certificate showing that you were living in their legal and physical custody.
 
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