DV 2020 All Selectees

SusieQQQ

Well-Known Member
The list of acceptable insurance types is quite long and broad and I can’t see that this will actually be a problem for most people:

https://www.whitehouse.gov/presiden...ially-burden-united-states-healthcare-system/

b) Approved health insurance means coverage under any of the following plans or programs:

(i) an employer-sponsored plan, including a retiree plan, association health plan, and coverage provided by the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985;

(ii) an unsubsidized health plan offered in the individual market within a State;

(iii) a short-term limited duration health policy effective for a minimum of 364 days — or until the beginning of planned, extended travel outside the United States;

(iv) a catastrophic plan;

(v) a family member’s plan;

(vi) a medical plan under chapter 55 of title 10, United States Code, including coverage under the TRICARE program;

(vii) a visitor health insurance plan that provides adequate coverage for medical care for a minimum of 364 days — or until the beginning of planned, extended travel outside the United States;

(viii) a medical plan under the Medicare program; or

(ix) any other health plan that provides adequate coverage for medical care as determined by the Secretary of Health and Human Services or his designee.
 
The list of acceptable insurance types is quite long and broad and I can’t see that this will actually be a problem for most people:

https://www.whitehouse.gov/presiden...ially-burden-united-states-healthcare-system/

b) Approved health insurance means coverage under any of the following plans or programs:

(i) an employer-sponsored plan, including a retiree plan, association health plan, and coverage provided by the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985;

(ii) an unsubsidized health plan offered in the individual market within a State;

(iii) a short-term limited duration health policy effective for a minimum of 364 days — or until the beginning of planned, extended travel outside the United States;

(iv) a catastrophic plan;

(v) a family member’s plan;

(vi) a medical plan under chapter 55 of title 10, United States Code, including coverage under the TRICARE program;

(vii) a visitor health insurance plan that provides adequate coverage for medical care for a minimum of 364 days — or until the beginning of planned, extended travel outside the United States;

(viii) a medical plan under the Medicare program; or

(ix) any other health plan that provides adequate coverage for medical care as determined by the Secretary of Health and Human Services or his designee.
Hi @SusieQQQ,

There is a part I don't understand about this proclamation. Does it come into effect when issuing an immigrant visa, or upon first entry into the US by an immigrant? As I'm wondering, if it affects issuing of a visa, is it possible to be insured by a US health insurer even before being sure of getting a visa?
 

Britsimon

Super Moderator
The list of acceptable insurance types is quite long and broad and I can’t see that this will actually be a problem for most people:

https://www.whitehouse.gov/presiden...ially-burden-united-states-healthcare-system/

b) Approved health insurance means coverage under any of the following plans or programs:

(i) an employer-sponsored plan, including a retiree plan, association health plan, and coverage provided by the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985;

(ii) an unsubsidized health plan offered in the individual market within a State;

(iii) a short-term limited duration health policy effective for a minimum of 364 days — or until the beginning of planned, extended travel outside the United States;

(iv) a catastrophic plan;

(v) a family member’s plan;

(vi) a medical plan under chapter 55 of title 10, United States Code, including coverage under the TRICARE program;

(vii) a visitor health insurance plan that provides adequate coverage for medical care for a minimum of 364 days — or until the beginning of planned, extended travel outside the United States;

(viii) a medical plan under the Medicare program; or

(ix) any other health plan that provides adequate coverage for medical care as determined by the Secretary of Health and Human Services or his designee.

Actually, I'm not so sure this is that easy. The proclamation (which is certain to be challenged) puts people in a tight spot. According to the wording, immigrant visas won't be issued unless the applicant shows they have one of the plan types you mention. So - obviously ACA plans are out because you can only get those once you are a resident. Employer plans won't be available as the applicants can't have a job unless they are here. Temporary plans are available but it seems someone will need to buy a years worth of coverage simply to present at the interview (unless the first entry is an activation trip). That is expensive and the visa is not guaranteed at that point... and so on. My point is - I don't see an easy, or affordable option for many immigrants - which, of course, is the point. It's what we are getting used to - the not so subtle combination of ignorance (possibly deliberate, often not) and racist undertones that the Trump/Miller team does so well.

I see legal challenges and TROs in the immediate future, but time will tell.

I can't wait to see a grown up back in the WH.
 

Britsimon

Super Moderator
Hi @SusieQQQ,

There is a part I don't understand about this proclamation. Does it come into effect when issuing an immigrant visa, or upon first entry into the US by an immigrant? As I'm wondering, if it affects issuing of a visa, is it possible to be insured by a US health insurer even before being sure of getting a visa?
That is the point of my post above, but to answer your first question...

"Sec. 3. Implementation and Enforcement. (a) An alien subject to this proclamation must establish that he or she meets its requirements, to the satisfaction of a consular officer, before the adjudication and issuance of an immigrant visa. "
 
That is the point of my post above, but to answer your first question...

"Sec. 3. Implementation and Enforcement. (a) An alien subject to this proclamation must establish that he or she meets its requirements, to the satisfaction of a consular officer, before the adjudication and issuance of an immigrant visa. "
Your point make a lot of sense. Let's wait and see if or how it will be implemented.
 
congratulation all selectees , i just have one question as a new member of this forum ,the authorities asked for address where to receive green card but what if we don't have one or we dont know anyone in US so far, i heard that i can use UPS mailbox but im not sur if it is acceptable or not please answer thanks so much
 

SusieQQQ

Well-Known Member
Actually, I'm not so sure this is that easy. The proclamation (which is certain to be challenged) puts people in a tight spot. According to the wording, immigrant visas won't be issued unless the applicant shows they have one of the plan types you mention. So - obviously ACA plans are out because you can only get those once you are a resident. Employer plans won't be available as the applicants can't have a job unless they are here. Temporary plans are available but it seems someone will need to buy a years worth of coverage simply to present at the interview (unless the first entry is an activation trip). That is expensive and the visa is not guaranteed at that point... and so on. My point is - I don't see an easy, or affordable option for many immigrants - which, of course, is the point. It's what we are getting used to - the not so subtle combination of ignorance (possibly deliberate, often not) and racist undertones that the Trump/Miller team does so well.

I see legal challenges and TROs in the immediate future, but time will tell.

I can't wait to see a grown up back in the WH.
I see challenges too, but, don’t forget it’s mostiy DV who have these kind of issues. The vast majority of green cards have family and employment sponsors, so the “or showing the funds” part is probably relatively easy for most of them - other than those who genuinely can’t afford health insurance. I think the vast majority of immigrants will be covered under (v). Even for those who aren’t, finding out how much ACA will be there in their state and showing they have funding for it is an option. You don’t have to have the insurance lined up first. Being one of those that even with insurance had a $4k out of pocket ER bill to pay, I’m not totally against this requirement, even as I agree with you that it is clearly aimed at deterring lower income migrants,
 
The implementation section in itself is quite short and vague. “To the satisfaction of a consular officer” means that there can be many different requirements depending on the applicant’s region, consulate or even officer. One officer/consulate might require an applicant to show enough funds to afford medical care, another might require actual enrollment before issuing visa.
 

SusieQQQ

Well-Known Member
The implementation section in itself is quite short and vague. “To the satisfaction of a consular officer” means that there can be many different requirements depending on the applicant’s region, consulate or even officer. One officer/consulate might require an applicant to show enough funds to afford medical care, another might require actual enrollment before issuing visa.
Public charge has always been at the discretion of a consular officer. Even before this, there have been reports of Cos requiring a sponsor to show cost of a health plan and how they will fund it for an intending immigrant.
 
Case AS9***; As KCC emailed me asking for documents, I have an attestation inquiry. I got a certified copy for my birth certificate from my birth country records as requested, and attested it by the foreign ministry of this Asian country. But my interview will be in Africa (my national and current resident country which is different than my birth one). I'm a bit worried... Do I need any more attestation/stamps as I will deal with U.S. Consulate in Africa not familiar with these "Asian" stamps? Will this Asian foreign ministry's stamp be enough? or should I get one more stamp from my birth country's embassy in Africa to be sure before sending it to KCC?
 

Sm1smom

Super Moderator
Case AS9***; As KCC emailed me asking for documents, I have an attestation inquiry. I got a certified copy for my birth certificate from my birth country records as requested, and attested it by the foreign ministry of this Asian country. But my interview will be in Africa (my national and current resident country which is different than my birth one). I'm a bit worried... Do I need any more attestation/stamps as I will deal with U.S. Consulate in Africa not familiar with these "Asian" stamps? Will this Asian foreign ministry's stamp be enough? or should I get one more stamp from my birth country's embassy in Africa to be sure before sending it to KCC?
Additional attestation/stamp not required. You just need to make sure you have English translated copies in addition if any of your document is not in English.
 
From how I understand it, this proclamation is mostly relevant to other visa types, people who already live in the US and make AOS to a green card (spouses, workers, students etc.). The DV visa is like the problematic child in the visa kindergarten as it's sort of like getting through the back door without much of the hassle of other visa types (years of waiting, I-864, conditional GC etc.)
I think we're panicking over nothing, no CO with basic common sense would expect you to have a valid health insurance "just in case you're approved". it's absurd. For people who will arrive to the US only after they're issued a visa it's more like a standard 'public charge' requirement, just to show you have enough funds, good education and job opportunities etc.
I hardly doubt it they would expect you to actually HAVE the insurance.
Anyway, all news sites report this and bash this absurd act, they also all say it's highly unlikely it will pass, immigrant advocates and groups are already fighting it.
 
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The thing is that , how could they want applicants to have an insurance when they don't have a visa , yet . What if someone doesn't pass the interview , how can they get their money back from the insurance company ?? It can make sense if the rule says that , one must prove/show a health insurance plan at the Port of entry . But to but a plan without even having a visa , is really illogical .
 
My interview is in a few days and I am so nervous that I am worried I will forget something (like a document) lol!
if everything goes well in the interview and my visa is approved, can I start celebrating or are is there a chance that you can be denied at POE when activating the visa?
 

SusieQQQ

Well-Known Member
My interview is in a few days and I am so nervous that I am worried I will forget something (like a document) lol!
if everything goes well in the interview and my visa is approved, can I start celebrating or are is there a chance that you can be denied at POE when activating the visa?
It’s extremely rare for someone holding an immigrant visa to be refused on entry - all the hard work is done before the visa is issued - and i’ve never heard of it happening with a DV visa. Just make sure you give yourself plenty of time to enter before it expires - don’t leave it to the last couple of days and risk some unforeseen travel event seeing the visa expire before you can use it.
 

Aidyn

Well-Known Member
My interview is in a few days and I am so nervous that I am worried I will forget something (like a document) lol!
if everything goes well in the interview and my visa is approved, can I start celebrating or are is there a chance that you can be denied at POE when activating the visa?
I remember being nervous that I'd forget something to. There is a checklist for Sydney embassy, I think I looked at it 100 times (and that was just on the morning of my interview). I'm sure you are well prepared so just sit back, breathe and relax!!
Good Luck
 
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