Waiting Asylum decision

That's actually true. But recommended approval usually issued soon after the interview (usually within a month). I haven't seen one issued after long wait.
I was interviewed on April 18th. My attorney called the Asylum Office today and they said they are undergoing a background check! They didn't disclose anything regarding the decision but my attorney said he's 95 percent sure this is an approval because NOID won't take this long and I have lived in the US for almost 4 years so my background check might take longer than the normal processing time! I'll keep you guys updated!
 
I was interviewed on April 18th. My attorney called the Asylum Office today and they said they are undergoing a background check! They didn't disclose anything regarding the decision but my attorney said he's 95 percent sure this is an approval because NOID won't take this long and I have lived in the US for almost 4 years so my background check might take longer than the normal processing time! I'll keep you guys updated!
I've seen people denied after 1 year of waiting for decision. Not a lot but still. Stay positive.
 
I filed my case on July 2015 with SF Office, and my interview was on December 2017. The status check says the case has been pending for 1392 days and the EAD clock is still running.
5 months ago I applied for renewal of my EAD card for the 5th time, and I just received a status change for that saying that they updated my name for Form I-765, which I assume means that I am going to get my new EAD card soon. It is weird though that this time it took 5 months to renew my card, while the last four times I had wait only a month or two to get my new card.
 
I filed my case on July 2015 with SF Office, and my interview was on December 2017. The status check says the case has been pending for 1392 days and the EAD clock is still running.
5 months ago I applied for renewal of my EAD card for the 5th time, and I just received a status change for that saying that they updated my name for Form I-765, which I assume means that I am going to get my new EAD card soon. It is weird though that this time it took 5 months to renew my card, while the last four times I had wait only a month or two to get my new card.

What number are you actually checking ZSF or some other?
 
Don't do it!

I think that there are legitimate merit points for suing USCIS for the delay in form processing.

However, if I was in your position, I would use the time to do something else. If you have an EAD, work hard and accumulate work experience. The 26 months I waited for my case to be processed, I had no EAD, so not allowed to work! If you have an EAD, move forward with your carrier, educate yourself with any extra money you have. If you have no EAD, do something else productive: During my 26 months of waiting for my case to be processed without an EAD, I wrote two books (novels ) and I worked as a volunteer journalist. For you, you can perhaps look at your case again, work with your lawyer to make ammendments that you can submit if the case is referred to Immigration Judge or you are called in for a second interview.

Anyway, my point is that, there are more productive things to do about/with your life THAN fighting USCIS. Of course, this just my opinion. You are entitled to do what you think is best for yourself. Good luck

I don't know if filing a writ of mandamus is a good idea or not since I don't have enough information about it. But I have to strongly disagree with the attitude that you described here as well. Throughout all these years my two cents were almost close to what you mentioned: to work hard and try to maintain a respectable place in this society, while at the same time giving back to a community that welcomed me here during the political distress that I had in my own country. But I wish everything was that simple!

When I applied for the asylum case I was graduate student here. Now after almost 5 years of studying hard and attaining academic merits I became Assistant Professor in a well-ranked university. For the last four years more than 2000 American students in my classes were graduated from college (each year I have approximately 600 hundred students) , while I still don't have any legal status in this country. And this alone complicates my situation here. For example in order to maintain my tenure-track position I am required to participate in conferences, symposiums, and academic events in my field on international level, but I am not able to travel outside of the States. As an artist and educator, over the course of last 3-4 years I had several art shows outside of the states, which is basically part of my academic research and also a requirement for tenure promotion, but unfortunately I couldn't go to my own exhibitions. And there are many other difficulties that I have experienced throughout my "productive" (to use your own word) years here which many of them jeopardized my social status as human being who is simply trying to have a "productive" and successful life.

Now I hope that you see how the positive image that you portrayed there has many crucial limits. And regardless of how hard you try to sustain a good life, those limits could keep you as a "nobody" who doesn't have any social status. How can you say to someone in this situation, whose life is at the edge of permanent loss of hope, to be positive, live your "nobody" life, and don't fight back? I am afraid that sooner or later you will realize that there is a line or limit for those passive attitudes.
 
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I don't know if filing a writ of mandamus is a good idea or not since I don't have enough information about it. But I have to strongly disagree with the attitude that you described here as well. Throughout all these years my two cents were almost close to what you mentioned: to work hard and try to maintain a respectable place in this society, while at the same time giving back to a community that welcomed me here during the political distress that I had in my own country. But I wish everything was that simple!

When I applied for the asylum case I was graduate student here. Now after almost 5 years of studying hard and attaining academic merits I became Assistant Professor in a well-ranked university. For the last four years more than 2000 American students in my classes were graduated from college (each year I have approximately 600 hundred students) , while I still don't have any legal status in this country. And this alone complicates my situation here. For example in order to maintain my tenure-track position I am required to participate in conferences, symposiums, and academic events in my field on international level, but I am not able to travel outside of the States. As an artist and educator, over the course of last 3-4 years I had several art shows outside of the states, which is basically part of my academic research and also a requirement for tenure promotion, but unfortunately I couldn't go to my own exhibitions. And there are many other difficulties that I have experienced throughout my "productive" (to use your own word) years here which many of them jeopardized my social status as human being who is simply trying to have a "productive" and successful life.

Now I hope that you see how the positive image that you portrayed there has many crucial limits. And regardless of how hard you try to sustain a good life, those limits could keep you as a "nobody" who doesn't have any social status. How can you say to someone in this situation, whose life is at the edge of permanent loss of hope, to be positive, live your "nobody" life, and don't fight back? I am afraid that sooner or later you will realize that there is a line or limit for those passive attitudes.

well said. I completely agree with that.
 
I don't know if filing a writ of mandamus is a good idea or not since I don't have enough information about it. But I have to strongly disagree with the attitude that you described here as well. Throughout all these years my two cents were almost close to what you mentioned: to work hard and try to maintain a respectable place in this society, while at the same time giving back to a community that welcomed me here during the political distress that I had in my own country. But I wish everything was that simple!

When I applied for the asylum case I was graduate student here. Now after almost 5 years of studying hard and attaining academic merits I became Assistant Professor in a well-ranked university. For the last four years more than 2000 American students in my classes were graduated from college (each year I have approximately 600 hundred students) , while I still don't have any legal status in this country. And this alone complicates my situation here. For example in order to maintain my tenure-track position I am required to participate in conferences, symposiums, and academic events in my field on international level, but I am not able to travel outside of the States. As an artist and educator, over the course of last 3-4 years I had several art shows outside of the states, which is basically part of my academic research and also a requirement for tenure promotion, but unfortunately I couldn't go to my own exhibitions. And there are many other difficulties that I have experienced throughout my "productive" (to use your own word) years here which many of them jeopardized my social status as human being who is simply trying to have a "productive" and successful life.

Now I hope that you see how the positive image that you portrayed there has many crucial limits. And regardless of how hard you try to sustain a good life, those limits could keep you as a "nobody" who doesn't have any social status. How can you say to someone in this situation, whose life is at the edge of permanent loss of hope, to be positive, live your "nobody" life, and don't fight back? I am afraid that sooner or later you will realize that there is a line or limit for those passive attitudes.
I qualified my statement above with:

During my time fighting my case, I met an Iranian man. His case had been pending since 1991. I met him in 2009 = 18 years. I remember fearing that if I miss court dates, etc, my case could fall into a black hole like his. This man's case had been handled by many many judges, his file was more than 5000 pages (voluminous).

I hate waiting. However, as I have grown older, I now select my battles carefully. Fighting USCIS is not one battle I would do. Of course, If I had unlimited time, lots of dollars to pay a team of lawyers, perhaps I could consider it. For the average person, I recommend not fighting USCIS.

Reaching out to the Senate/Congressmen office, checking in at the field office with an infopass, better options to try to push the case forward.

I think that you didn't read the whole story. I use the word 'hate' in a lot of sentences regarding waiting for the case to be resolved. Like you, my life was at a standstill, couldn't travel internationally, etc. I know that most people are in difficult situations, like the Iranian man above. Fighting my case, I met many people in very distressing situations, people who could not work, their EAD clock frozen for years, but had families to support. I met people who couldn't travel internationally to go and bury their dead close families.

Now, in these difficult situations, what is the best course of action? The majority of asylum seekers don't have the resources to find lawyers. For those people, i wrote above that perhaps it's better to do something else instead of suing USCIS: write to congressman/senator, check in with USCIS ombudsman, etc. These are low resource alternatives than fighting USCIS. Doing this, is hardly a passive attitude.

However, if you have the resources, money to pay the lawyers, I wrote that, yep...go ahead and fight USCIS. Like I wrote above, if I had the money, perhaps I would fight USCIS.

Anyway, at the end of the day, we are all in our own situations. It is up to us individually to decide what's best for us. Then again in my comment above, I clearly said that advising people not to fight USCIS was just MY opinion...at the end of the day, people had to do what was BEST for themselves...which meant: if you or anybody else think that fighting USCIS is good for them, they should go right ahead and do it.
 
What about 2 years waiting what decision could that be?
Any. There's no guarantee that if you wait long than it's an approval. It most likely an approval but it's not a 100%.

You mean that after submitting the rebuttal, the decision can take up to 6 months to be made and received ? I mean currently they are expediting all the asylum procedures! Or does it mean if it is late , it might be an approval ?

I'm not saying up to 6 months. I said that majority of decisions (in general, not only after rebuttal) are issued within 6 months period.
 
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