VISA Information for Countries

asyleeSF

Member
Many people have done that and they were fine. I went to Spain, Portugal, Iceland and Greece and I had no problem at all. They are all within the Schengen Zone meaning there is no borders between the countries.

You took flights between them, right?
Then only first entrance country is need to be visa-free (like Germany)
 

dolcevita

New Member
Yes you can fly anywhere even if you still don't have GC. It's safe from my experience. ^^

BTW, do you guys travel with your country's passport sometimes (passport from the country you fled from)?
I have this travel planned for a country that I need visa for (with RTD) so thought I would just use my other passport since it's still valid... I know a lot of people are avoiding this, but they only care if you go to the country you fled from, right? If it's some other country why does it matter??
 

msv5450

Active Member
Yes you can fly anywhere even if you still don't have GC. It's safe from my experience. ^^

BTW, do you guys travel with your country's passport sometimes (passport from the country you fled from)?
I have this travel planned for a country that I need visa for (with RTD) so thought I would just use my other passport since it's still valid... I know a lot of people are avoiding this, but they only care if you go to the country you fled from, right? If it's some other country why does it matter??
When you go to your GC interview, they will check if you have used your national passport. Using that for traveling is like obtaining privilege from the country you sought protection from. Don't do it.
 

msv5450

Active Member
Yes you can fly anywhere even if you still don't have GC. It's safe from my experience. ^^

BTW, do you guys travel with your country's passport sometimes (passport from the country you fled from)?
I have this travel planned for a country that I need visa for (with RTD) so thought I would just use my other passport since it's still valid... I know a lot of people are avoiding this, but they only care if you go to the country you fled from, right? If it's some other country why does it matter??
Can you share your timeline for asylum?
 

dolcevita

New Member
I already have GC. Sorry I lost track of my timeline. I got GC a year ago. I waited less than 4 months for it....
 

asyleeSF

Member
When you go to your GC interview, they will check if you have used your national passport. Using that for traveling is like obtaining privilege from the country you sought protection from. Don't do it.
Is there an interview process for asylees while having/applying a GC after a year?
 

msv5450

Active Member
Is there an interview process for asylees while having/applying a GC after a year?
yes but it is not as rigorous as the initial interview. They just check if your asylum claim is still valid and you have not traveled to your home country.
 

asyleeSF

Member
yes but it is not as rigorous as the initial interview. They just check if your asylum claim is still valid and you have not traveled to your home country.
I have a few friends, they didn't have interviews for GC. Maybe it's based on the applicant etc.
 

zman44

Active Member
No, interviews for Asylees applying for a GC are actually not as common. An interview is usually only required when the officer needs to verify something, or if you have a bad record with USCIS. Otherwise, as long as the application is filled out correctly and the the right documents sent, you don't get called for an interview.
 

7of9

Active Member
https://www.uscis.gov/policy-manual/volume-7-part-m-chapter-5 : and here: https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?&node=se8.1.209_12

(e) Interview. USCIS will determine, on a case-by-case basis, whether an interview by an immigration officer is necessary to determine the applicant's admissibility for permanent resident status under this part.

Interviews are generally required when an officer at a service center is unable to verify identity or eligibility or determine admissibility based solely on the available immigration records. Although officers may decide to relocate a case to a field office for interview on a case-by-case basis, the service center officer should generally relocate a case to the field for interview if it meets one of the following criteria:

  • The officer cannot verify the identity of the applicant through the information in the A-file.
  • The officer can verify the identity of the applicant through the information in the A-file, but the applicant is claiming a new identity.
  • Immigration records are insufficient for the officer to determine whether or not the applicant has asylum status.
  • The applicant has an approved Form I-730 but, if granted overseas, was not interviewed as part of the overseas process or, if in the United States, was not interviewed prior to the approval.
  • The applicant’s FBI fingerprint results indicate a record that may cause the applicant to be inadmissible, or the applicant has had 2 unclassifiable fingerprints and the applicant must provide a sworn statement at an interview.
  • The officer cannot determine the applicant’s admissibility without an interview.
  • The officer determines that the applicant is inadmissible but that an interview is necessary to determine if a waiver is appropriate.
  • There is evidence that suggests that the original grant of asylum may have been obtained through fraud or misrepresentation.
  • There is evidence that suggests that the principal asylum applicant no longer meets the definition of a refugee.
  • There is evidence that suggests that the asylee derivative beneficiary no longer has the requisite relationship to adjust status as a derivate spouse or child.
The Chicago office called me in for an 'interview' = the officer updated my address on file. that was the interview. - What I know for a fact is that, the Chicago office lost my asylum application file. So they couldn't go back to review it. Calling me in for an interview, just a weird/strange formality: Yeah, the original asylum file/case file is lost. So, let's call him in, to at least show that we did some form of verification/etc. The reason I was called in, has nothing to do with the above scenarios as listed in the field adjudication manual.
 

msv5450

Active Member
I wonder what's with GC now... how long is the wait?
I applied in Nov 2019, NSC
Waiting
If you have not received your biometric and medical test appointment, it is a bit odd. It takes 8-12 months to the GC.
Nebraska has been very slow lately.
 

flower201

Member
If you have not received your biometric and medical test appointment, it is a bit odd. It takes 8-12 months to the GC.
Nebraska has been very slow lately.

did biometrics in Dec 2019 (less than a month after they received the case)
medicals test? what is this?
i just did regular medicals and sent together with the form
 

zman44

Active Member
You don't receive a medical test appointment from USCIS. You're supposed to find a civil surgeon and setup an appointment on your own to have them perform a medical exam. Then you go back to the clinic and receive a sealed envelop, which you then send to USCIS ideally with your initial application. It can be sent later though.
 

flower201

Member
Happiest day for me!!! NSC


11/07/2019 We received your Form I-485, Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status.
11/12/2019 We accepted the fingerprint fee for your Form I-485, Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status. Our Nebraska Service Center location is working on your case.
12/05/2019 The fingerprints relating to your Form I-485 Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status, were taken.
New Card Is Being Produced On April 15, 2020, we ordered your new card for Receipt Number ...
 
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