VISA Information for Countries

Hi Mike, I've been reading your message and I'd like to ask you a few question.
I'm going to Munich and using RTD only for the first time, did you travel around Europe recently without schengen visa?
Since this is will be my first time, will I get any problem coming back to JFK from europe since I only have RTD with me.
Thanks a lot :)

No need passport??? Right? Only RTD
 

cafeconleche

Registered Users (C)
Where are you going? If you have an RTD you can travel on that as long as the countries to which you are going recognise the document. You don't need a passport in such cases.
 
You need a visa to visit Istanbul with RTD
thanks! I am just trying to figure out where to travel... I want to see my relatives and my husband's relatives in third country
and Germany going to be way too expensive for trip for 9 ppl :-D lol
Istanbul was pretty cheap in 2012 as far as I remember
 
btw, I haven't find any info about Netherlands on their website (like on Germany , for example)... that I can travel visa-free there....do you know where to find it (for print)? thanks !!!
 
thanks! I am just trying to figure out where to travel... I want to see my relatives and my husband's relatives in third country
and Germany going to be way too expensive for trip for 9 ppl :-D lol
Istanbul was pretty cheap in 2012 as far as I remember
You can visit Croatia or Belgium also Cyprus is an option to visit visa free with an RTD
 
thanks! I am just trying to figure out where to travel... I want to see my relatives and my husband's relatives in third country
and Germany going to be way too expensive for trip for 9 ppl :-D lol
Istanbul was pretty cheap in 2012 as far as I remember
Also Montenegro and bosnia are cheaper options with visa free access with only RTD
 

DoubleAA

Registered Users (C)
Alternately, you can go to a country where only YOU require a visa if you save a lot of money in total.
This topic/ question has been here before many times I need your experienced advice: Personally, I have researched that the requirement for a visa is sometimes based on your citizenship, not on your country of residence, I have previously held "carte de légitimation" or Ci permit, I know there are Schengen countries which will accept your refugee travel document without a visa: Belgium, Croatia, Germany, Hungary, the Netherlands, and Slovakia. provide Exit or Entry stamps to USCIS issued RTDs regardless of country of citizenship. is it worth going around Schengen after having one entry stamp or go to the only country that allows RTD OR Apply for Visa, I know visa fees do add up?

I'm a permanent resident of the USA with a green card and I have a travel document issued by the USA (I-571). Will I have any issues traveling around in the Schengen countries.
 

cafeconleche

Registered Users (C)
As mentioned here, you are legally NOT allowed to go to Schengen countries that would normally require a visa from you. The exception to the visa rule for RTD holders or LPRs is a bilateral one that several countries make. In practice, they do not check within Schengen, and if they do, they might not know/bother to give you trouble. However, there is of course the chance that you COULD be detained for the lack of a visa, depending on many factors.

It seems that most of those on this forum who have been around Schengen without a visa after entering via a country with an exception have experienced no problems. I think there was only one person who faced some issues, but was let go in the end (I am not sure - does somebody remember?).

So, in the end, it is at your risk to do so. I personally would not, unless I was staying near a border and wanted to try to cross it for a quick trip or something. But, I am generally paranoid about being stuck somewhere with a travel document.

BTW, regarding visa requirements being based on citizenship and not travel document, this varies. The blanket rule is it is based on citizenship. But, on top of that, many countries make exceptions based on residency and travel history.
 
So, in preparation of my trip this month, in May, I applied for RTD renewal. This was the third time applying for it, after applying for it in 2016 and 2017. I got the RTD after 6 months this year, up from 65 days in 2016, and 80 days in 2017. I don't know what is happening at DHS, these long processing times are unheard off. The current administration is punishing us for real. I wonder what the wait time will be for RTD renewal in 2019? Anyway, readying for my trip now.
 

DoubleAA

Registered Users (C)
So, in preparation of my trip this month, in May, I applied for RTD renewal. This was the third time applying for it, after applying for it in 2016 and 2017. I got the RTD after 6 months this year, up from 65 days in 2016, and 80 days in 2017. I don't know what is happening at DHS, these long processing times are unheard off. The current administration is punishing us for real. I wonder what the wait time will be for RTD renewal in 2019? Anyway, readying for my trip now.


My Renewal took less 4 months; my first RTD took nine months and three days to be produced and issued. Check my Case status screenshot attached. The Modernised Case Status system will tell you if your case is stuck at fingerprints or even RFE was issued etc.
 

Attachments

I guess I was just unlucky. On the processing time link, it does show that cases now take 4-6months to complete. Hopefully like you guys say, it will take 8 weeks next year! Next year is my last renewal since in Jan 2020 I will submit my citizenship application.
 

DoubleAA

Registered Users (C)
As mentioned here, you are legally NOT allowed to go to Schengen countries that would normally require a visa from you. The exception to the visa rule for RTD holders or LPRs is a bilateral one that several countries make. In practice, they do not check within Schengen, and if they do, they might not know/bother to give you trouble. However, there is, of course, the chance that you COULD be detained for the lack of a visa, depending on many factors.

It seems that most of those on this forum who have been around Schengen without a visa after entering via a country with an exception have experienced no problems. I think there was only one person who faced some issues, but was let go in the end (I am not sure - does somebody remember?).

So, in the end, it is at your risk to do so. I personally would not, unless I was staying near a border and wanted to try to cross it for a quick trip or something. But, I am generally paranoid about being stuck somewhere with a travel document.

BTW, regarding visa requirements being based on citizenship and not travel document, this varies. The blanket rule is it is based on citizenship. But, on top of that, many countries make exceptions based on residency and travel history.


I agree with you , the risk can be very expensive. ''As mentioned here, you are legally NOT allowed to go to Schengen countries that would normally require a visa from you.'
 
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