Trump’s New Executive Action - Travel Suspension

SusieQQQ

Well-Known Member
#22
Thanks Simon. Having the difficult conversations with my husband now. There are four of us to fly from Auckland to Honolulu and back if we want to do a weekend activation trip. It’s a massive expense when we consider the flights we booked to Europe that we won’t get any money back on, and then the eventual flight to Chicago. Too risky for just me to go as the main applicant? I’m guessing yes.
a lot of airlines have relaxed their change/cancellation fees with all this, it doesn’t hurt to check again about refunds.
 
#23
Yep. Fully agree guys. Well. Looks like a family trip for one night in Honolulu is on the cards for next weekend! Makes my stress over the medical and interview look like nothing!
 
#25
Hi all, just after some confirmation that I am reading the proclamation correctly.

I'm heading to Honolulu from Australia today to activate my LPR status just in case the ban extends to Australia within the next few weeks. I have another trip booked for the end of March. We (my wife and three kids) are then due to fly to Honolulu at the end of May where we plan on activating their visas. The Proclamation states:

Sec. 2. Scope of Suspension and Limitation on Entry.
(a) Section 1 of this proclamation shall not apply to:
(i) any lawful permanent resident of the United States;
(ii) any alien who is the spouse of a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident;

I read this as - we could still travel to Hawaii in May even if Australia was added to the banned countries list as I will have pernanent residency status which then allows my wife and children to enter also.

Am I interpreting that correctly?

Thanks
 
#26
Hi all, just after some confirmation that I am reading the proclamation correctly.

I'm heading to Honolulu from Australia today to activate my LPR status just in case the ban extends to Australia within the next few weeks. I have another trip booked for the end of March. We (my wife and three kids) are then due to fly to Honolulu at the end of May where we plan on activating their visas. The Proclamation states:

Sec. 2. Scope of Suspension and Limitation on Entry.
(a) Section 1 of this proclamation shall not apply to:
(i) any lawful permanent resident of the United States;
(ii) any alien who is the spouse of a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident;

I read this as - we could still travel to Hawaii in May even if Australia was added to the banned countries list as I will have pernanent residency status which then allows my wife and children to enter also.

Am I interpreting that correctly?

Thanks
Yes that’s my understanding, as it is right now. However that could change. My family decided it wasn’t worth the risk, so we’re all flying to Honolulu from NZ on Friday. Fingers crossed NZ and Oz aren’t on the list by then!
 
#27
Fortunately, our visas are valid until August so we have a bit of time. I guess even if NZ and Aus are added to the list, the proclamation would still allow us to enter on my LPR status. This would only change if they changed the Scope of Suspension and Limitation on Entry.
 

SusieQQQ

Well-Known Member
#28
Fortunately, our visas are valid until August so we have a bit of time. I guess even if NZ and Aus are added to the list, the proclamation would still allow us to enter on my LPR status. This would only change if they changed the Scope of Suspension and Limitation on Entry.
That’s the risk, I for one would not be surprised if family of LPRs falls off the list if things get much worse than they’re expecting.
 

Britsimon

Super Moderator
#30
Hi all, just after some confirmation that I am reading the proclamation correctly.

I'm heading to Honolulu from Australia today to activate my LPR status just in case the ban extends to Australia within the next few weeks. I have another trip booked for the end of March. We (my wife and three kids) are then due to fly to Honolulu at the end of May where we plan on activating their visas. The Proclamation states:

Sec. 2. Scope of Suspension and Limitation on Entry.
(a) Section 1 of this proclamation shall not apply to:
(i) any lawful permanent resident of the United States;
(ii) any alien who is the spouse of a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident;

I read this as - we could still travel to Hawaii in May even if Australia was added to the banned countries list as I will have permanent residency status which then allows my wife and children to enter also.

Am I interpreting that correctly?

Thanks
Yes that is correct. Up to now, any Citizen/LPR is allowed to return to the USA even from areas that have been locked down such as the Shengen area and now UK/Ireland.

The next level UP (if they decide to get tougher) in terms if precaution is probably what NZ have done which is to enforce a 14 day quarantine on entries including citizens/residents. That makes a lot of sense in NZ who have an excellent chance of containing the virus well with such an early and heavy handed approach. It probably does not make as much sense in the USA now, but let's face it, this administration isn't well known for applying common sense.

Of course the ultimate level is a complete ban in inbound travel, including citizens, but given that we already have the virus is volume, and understanding that the 2000+ reported cases is low because of inadequate testing, a complete ban wouldn't make much sense - but again - what makes sense doesn't necessarily mean that's what Trump would do.
 
#31
Yes that is correct. Up to now, any Citizen/LPR is allowed to return to the USA even from areas that have been locked down such as the Shengen area and now UK/Ireland.

The next level UP (if they decide to get tougher) in terms if precaution is probably what NZ have done which is to enforce a 14 day quarantine on entries including citizens/residents. That makes a lot of sense in NZ who have an excellent chance of containing the virus well with such an early and heavy handed approach. It probably does not make as much sense in the USA now, but let's face it, this administration isn't well known for applying common sense.

Of course the ultimate level is a complete ban in inbound travel, including citizens, but given that we already have the virus is volume, and understanding that the 2000+ reported cases is low because of inadequate testing, a complete ban wouldn't make much sense - but again - what makes sense doesn't necessarily mean that's what Trump would do.
Well NZ’s announcement came as a bit of a shock last night, to say the least! We’re incredibly lucky my husband take two weeks paid time off work, and mine will let me work from home when we return from Honolulu in a week. We’re quite worried our flightsto Honolulu for Friday will be cancelled. And that the kids’ schools won’t be as understanding as our employers! But we’re lucky and we’re not worried about our lives (or risking other people’s) like in some countries.
 
#32
Yes that is correct. Up to now, any Citizen/LPR is allowed to return to the USA even from areas that have been locked down such as the Shengen area and now UK/Ireland.

The next level UP (if they decide to get tougher) in terms if precaution is probably what NZ have done which is to enforce a 14 day quarantine on entries including citizens/residents. That makes a lot of sense in NZ who have an excellent chance of containing the virus well with such an early and heavy handed approach. It probably does not make as much sense in the USA now, but let's face it, this administration isn't well known for applying common sense.

Of course the ultimate level is a complete ban in inbound travel, including citizens, but given that we already have the virus is volume, and understanding that the 2000+ reported cases is low because of inadequate testing, a complete ban wouldn't make much sense - but again - what makes sense doesn't necessarily mean that's what Trump would do.
Based on the information on the DHS website, US citizens and LPRs are required to undergo 14 day self-quarantine when returning from any of the restricted countries, if I'm reading correctly.

https://www.dhs.gov/news/2020/03/13...ions-china-iran-and-schengen-countries-europe

I'd be interested to know what the process would be if you were heading over for less than the 14 days. Would you be allowed to fly back out?
ie you head over for a quick activation trip after the primary applicant has already become an LPR.
 

SusieQQQ

Well-Known Member
#33
Based on the information on the DHS website, US citizens and LPRs are required to undergo 14 day self-quarantine when returning from any of the restricted countries, if I'm reading correctly.

https://www.dhs.gov/news/2020/03/13...ions-china-iran-and-schengen-countries-europe

I'd be interested to know what the process would be if you were heading over for less than the 14 days. Would you be allowed to fly back out?
ie you head over for a quick activation trip after the primary applicant has already become an LPR.
I can confirm that a friend has been ordered under quarantine after a recent return from Europe.

I don’t think arriving at an airport (of all places to spread a disease...) when you are supposed to be in quarantine would be looked upon kindly at all, not to mention it is incredibly selfish and reckless from a public health perspective. If you want to activate from an affected area while this is going on, plan to make it a 15 day trip.
 

SusieQQQ

Well-Known Member
#34
I can confirm that a friend has been ordered under quarantine after a recent return from Europe.

I don’t think arriving at an airport (of all places to spread a disease...) when you are supposed to be in quarantine would be looked upon kindly at all, not to mention it is incredibly selfish and reckless from a public health perspective. If you want to activate from an affected area while this is going on, plan to make it a 15 day trip.
update... you’re Australian right? So at this point you’d need to self quarantine for 2 weeks in the US and then the same again when you get back home ... so much for a “quick activation trip”. Probably best to plan to just move properly when you go?
 
#35
update... you’re Australian right? So at this point you’d need to self quarantine for 2 weeks in the US and then the same again when you get back home ... so much for a “quick activation trip”. Probably best to plan to just move properly when you go?
For Australia and NZ, there is (currently) no need to self quarantine on arrival to the US. Only when you get back to Oz/NZ. It’s LPRs travelling from China, Iran, and Europe who have to quarantine.
 

SusieQQQ

Well-Known Member
#36
For Australia and NZ, there is (currently) no need to self quarantine on arrival to the US. Only when you get back to Oz/NZ. It’s LPRs travelling from China, Iran, and Europe who have to quarantine.
Yes, but the question I responded to was hypothesizing activating during a time of self quarantine:

Based on the information on the DHS website, US citizens and LPRs are required to undergo 14 day self-quarantine when returning from any of the restricted countries, if I'm reading correctly.

https://www.dhs.gov/news/2020/03/13...ions-china-iran-and-schengen-countries-europe

I'd be interested to know what the process would be if you were heading over for less than the 14 days. Would you be allowed to fly back out?
ie you head over for a quick activation trip after the primary applicant has already become an LPR.

(By the way I did state on another thread that if there were any Aus-US restrictions it would likely be Australia imposing them first!)
 

newacct

Well-Known Member
#37
I'd be interested to know what the process would be if you were heading over for less than the 14 days. Would you be allowed to fly back out?
ie you head over for a quick activation trip after the primary applicant has already become an LPR.
Self-quarantine means you are asked to monitor your own health and avoid interactions if possible (until 14 days since you were last in one of the designated countries), but there is no restriction on where you can go, so yes you can go to the airport and fly back out if you want. The next time you return to the US, whether you will have to self-quarantine will again be determined based on whether you have been in one of those countries in the last 14 days at that time.
 

SusieQQQ

Well-Known Member
#38
From the link above

Screening & Quarantine
Upon arrival, travelers will proceed to standard customs processing. They will then continue to an enhanced entry screening where the passenger will be asked about their medical history, current condition, and asked for contact information for local health authorities. Additionally, some passengers will have their temperature taken.

After the enhanced entry screening is complete, passengers will be given written guidance about COVID-19 and be allowed to proceed to their final destination.

Once home, individuals must immediately self-quarantine in their home and monitor their health in accordance with CDC best practices.

In order to ensure compliance, local and State public health officials will contact individuals in the days and weeks following their arrival.
 

newacct

Well-Known Member
#39
Once home, individuals must immediately self-quarantine in their home and monitor their health in accordance with CDC best practices.

In order to ensure compliance, local and State public health officials will contact individuals in the days and weeks following their arrival.
Yes, self-quarantine in their home means that they are recommended to stay home as much as possible, but they can still go out and do stuff. Their movement is not formally restricted. I guess if they leave the US they should inform the public health authorities so they don't need to follow up anymore.
 

SusieQQQ

Well-Known Member
#40
Maybe your understanding of “in the home” is different to the health authorities. Here is what happened to someone who did not stay literally in the home:
Page said health and county officials learned about the father's actions Sunday and told him that he needs to stay in isolation. If he does not comply with orders, health officials will seek a court order and "issue a formal quarantine that will require him and the rest of his family to stay in their home by the force of law," Yes, this is someone with known exposure, but that doesn’t change the principle from someone who just doesn’t yet know they’ve been exposed.

it’s sad that it seems some people need to be forced or coerced into things like this. Maybe you still live in an area that is not affected yet so you are still unaware of how quickly it spreads. or maybe you just don’t care about potentially being the asymptomatic carrier passing it onto a vulnerable person who dies as a result. It’s a public health issue, it’s not just about you.
 
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