The "been there done that" thread: life in the US after DV

SusieQQQ

Well-Known Member
Should i waste more energy on you guys? Last message and i will seek for advice elsewhere... Yes, AGAIN, i am aware that you know if my situation back from 2017 changed or not in the last couple of months... #clever... High road and right attitude is when you avoid confrotation and give the useful information, and you just answered the way i expected you to do... #clever2 "IMPORTANT NOTE: I am a Volunteer Moderator - one of you. The information and assistance I provide is not for any profit motive. I am just trying to help to the best of my knowledge, information and belief. If you rely upon any advice or information I give or any actions I take in the community forums, you do so at your own risk. I am not a lawyer. So act accordingly.? - This is what they have written under and the most energy they waste is to feed the ego and just be arrogant as most of their responses are. Great job lads, truly remarkable work! P.S. You should step up your game, as they say in my country "for biggest Pope in the village there is always a bigger pope"... Now step aside and let people share their experience. #overandout #mrsupizdumaterinu
Wow. If you expended a fraction the amount of energy you do ranting and raving on simple google searches instead, your puzzlingly basic questions about things like “are jobs only on Craigslist” and “how do I find accommodation” would be answered very quickly and easily. Lol. You seem to be treating this forum like everyone should roll over backwards and do your work for you.... I’m not entirely sure you realize what living in the US is actually like, but certainly you need to be wished good luck....
 
Your post from August 18th, 2017 speaks for itself: (bold applied by me for emphasis):



Mar 12, 2018:


Now I’m arrogant and I act stupid? I suppose I didn’t come across as arrogant and stupid when you were lapping up all the answers I provided to your questions from 2017, or when you originally sent me a PM to ask this question two days ago and I asked you to post your questions in the open forum?

I have a few choice words I could use in describing how you come across now, but I will take the high road and refrain from using them. Just remember, karma is a bitch like they say.

#Sm1out#
Mic drop...
That's a grade a smackdown :)
 
Lol ;) that was the intended effect.
Honestly I don't understand some people - the silly questions that they ask on here - and you moderators are always so patient.

Anyway... I just had my visa go to "issued" today so USA here I come! I'm so excited!

Thanks again to all of the moderators. I think without this forum and BritSimon's website I wouldn't have been approved.
 

Sm1smom

Super Moderator
Honestly I don't understand some people - the silly questions that they ask on here - and you moderators are always so patient.

Anyway... I just had my visa go to "issued" today so USA here I come! I'm so excited!

Thanks again to all of the moderators. I think without this forum and BritSimon's website I wouldn't have been approved.
Congratulations! All the best.
 
hi everyone hope yall doing well, i'm wondering do i have to change my DL address while im outside US cause i was trying to do it but i keep getting "im not eligible to change it online", i've changed my home address in the USCIC after my relatives moves from there old house
 
hello,

Since I got my Visa I plan to go to USA to "activate" my green card in 1 month. I plan to stay there 1 week (NYC).

What should I expect from immigration once I'm there ?
Can I stay 1 week ?
Do I need an address there ? Can I give a friend's address ?
Can I give an address in SF (where I'll never be physically there)?
After how long I'll receive my GC?

Thank you !
 

Sm1smom

Super Moderator
hello,

Since I got my Visa I plan to go to USA to "activate" my green card in 1 month. I plan to stay there 1 week (NYC).

What should I expect from immigration once I'm there ?
Can I stay 1 week ?
Do I need an address there ? Can I give a friend's address ?
Can I give an address in SF (where I'll never be physically there)?
After how long I'll receive my GC?

Thank you !
1. Expect to be inspected and processed.
2. Yes.
3. Yes.
4. Yes.
5. Could be within a month or a couple of months.
 
Hi there. Just wanted to check with folks about a tax issue. We got an extension on our tax filing because we'd only just moved here in March. Now our tax accountant is filing for us for last year. That was the year we "activated" our Green Cards but we were only in the states for about 10 days on holiday. We seem to be getting a (not unmanageable but not insignificant) bill on our Australian earnings for that year, while we were still Australian residents and being taxed in Australia. Is this to be expected for your first year? I'd been led to believe that you shouldn't be taxed on amounts Australia already taxes us on. We're not high earners and don't own property or shares and earned nothing in the US that year. We've had a few concerns about this tax guy - we've had to correct him and repeat information to him a few times - so just trying, as someone with zero experience of the US tax system, to establish whether he's messed this up or if it's totally normal to cop a US tax bill during an activation year when you hadn't made the final move yet.
 

SusieQQQ

Well-Known Member
Hi there. Just wanted to check with folks about a tax issue. We got an extension on our tax filing because we'd only just moved here in March. Now our tax accountant is filing for us for last year. That was the year we "activated" our Green Cards but we were only in the states for about 10 days on holiday. We seem to be getting a (not unmanageable but not insignificant) bill on our Australian earnings for that year, while we were still Australian residents and being taxed in Australia. Is this to be expected for your first year? I'd been led to believe that you shouldn't be taxed on amounts Australia already taxes us on. We're not high earners and don't own property or shares and earned nothing in the US that year. We've had a few concerns about this tax guy - we've had to correct him and repeat information to him a few times - so just trying, as someone with zero experience of the US tax system, to establish whether he's messed this up or if it's totally normal to cop a US tax bill during an activation year when you hadn't made the final move yet.
First - when you say you were in the US for 10 days - did you activate on or around 21 December? If not the number of days you were physically present doesn’t matter, the date that matters is the date you landed. You are taxed as a green card holder from that date onwards. Whether or not you’ve made the final move is irrelevant to the IRS, what is relevant is that you are taxed as a resident from activation date. And I presume you know that you are taxed on worldwide earnings.
Generally there is an offset from taxes paid elsewhere as long as there is a tax treaty, and there is also an exemption on some foreign income (not sure what the updated figure is but I think it’s somewhere around $100k). Depending on exactly what kind of income is being taxed, you may indeed find that you owe something.
All that said....If you’re not earning a massive amount and all your earning is salary, no capital gains etc, then it is however surprising to me if you end up owing something significant and you may want to consult another tax guy.

Also whatever you do do NOT call yourself a non-resident (you said “Australian residents”) on your tax return after your green card date. This is a question that is asked later in the n400 and even if you don’t get to that stage it can still be considered as you abandoning your green cards.
 
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Hi there. Just wanted to check with folks about a tax issue. We got an extension on our tax filing because we'd only just moved here in March. Now our tax accountant is filing for us for last year. That was the year we "activated" our Green Cards but we were only in the states for about 10 days on holiday. We seem to be getting a (not unmanageable but not insignificant) bill on our Australian earnings for that year, while we were still Australian residents and being taxed in Australia. Is this to be expected for your first year? I'd been led to believe that you shouldn't be taxed on amounts Australia already taxes us on. We're not high earners and don't own property or shares and earned nothing in the US that year. We've had a few concerns about this tax guy - we've had to correct him and repeat information to him a few times - so just trying, as someone with zero experience of the US tax system, to establish whether he's messed this up or if it's totally normal to cop a US tax bill during an activation year when you hadn't made the final move yet.
It is actually possible to be resident in two countries at the same time (US and Australia). I read that if you've been outside US more than a year, your green card is considered abandoned. US citizens who live abroad for decades and not returned (like some of my friends) have to file US income tax papers every year (FATCA regulations). It's been a major reason why some renounced their US citizenship, including some high profile people. Anyway, I've seen an Australian and US treaty on the avoidance of double taxation, so I'm sure taxes you paid in Australia will be discounted from the US income tax. If you're not a high income earner, I doubt you should be getting a high bill. Maybe your accountant is charging high service fees from his own office?
 
First - when you say you were in the US for 10 days - did you activate on or around 21 December? If not the number of days you were physically present doesn’t matter, the date that matters is the date you landed. You are taxed as a green card holder from that date onwards. Whether or not you’ve made the final move is irrelevant to the IRS, what is relevant is that you are taxed as a resident from activation date. And I presume you know that you are taxed on worldwide earnings.
Generally there is an offset from taxes paid elsewhere as long as there is a tax treaty, and there is also an exemption on some foreign income (not sure what the updated figure is but I think it’s somewhere around $100k). Depending on exactly what kind of income is being taxed, you may indeed find that you owe something.
All that said....If you’re not earning a massive amount and all your earning is salary, no capital gains etc, then it is however surprising to me if you end up owing something significant and you may want to consult another tax guy.

Also whatever you do do NOT call yourself a non-resident (you said “Australian residents”) on your tax return after your green card date. This is a question that is asked later in the n400 and even if you don’t get to that stage it can still be considered as you abandoning your green cards.
Thanks to both of you for the advice. Susie you mean on our US tax return we wouldn't say we're Australian residents right? I think we're all good with that. Our Australian Tax agent would have filed us as Australian residents for the 16/17 financial year - (we activated in the last few months of that FY so hopefully we didn't mess that upon the Australian end). But we're filing as residents here, as of our activation date.

I think what may have hurt us this time is the fact we had Australian ABNs for a bit of freelance writing work we did on the side. And getting a painful tax bill is really galling given how poorly that work actually paid - it was only a few small jobs. This tax guy wouldn't let us claim many of the business expenses we used to bring that taxable freelance income down in Australia.

I think it's a little too late to get another tax guy this time around and will just involve more expense given we paid a chunk of his fee upfront. Will definitely get a new one for next year. I mean, he had my old work address listed as "Argentina" rather than Australia so god knows what else he got wrong. Bizarre seeing as he's an Aussie working over here, which is why I went with him. Anyone got any good Australia/US expat tax agents, I'd love to know!
 
Thanks to both of you for the advice. Susie you mean on our US tax return we wouldn't say we're Australian residents right? I think we're all good with that. Our Australian Tax agent would have filed us as Australian residents for the 16/17 financial year - (we activated in the last few months of that FY so hopefully we didn't mess that upon the Australian end). But we're filing as residents here, as of our activation date.

I think what may have hurt us this time is the fact we had Australian ABNs for a bit of freelance writing work we did on the side. And getting a painful tax bill is really galling given how poorly that work actually paid - it was only a few small jobs. This tax guy wouldn't let us claim many of the business expenses we used to bring that taxable freelance income down in Australia.

I think it's a little too late to get another tax guy this time around and will just involve more expense given we paid a chunk of his fee upfront. Will definitely get a new one for next year. I mean, he had my old work address listed as "Argentina" rather than Australia so god knows what else he got wrong. Bizarre seeing as he's an Aussie working over here, which is why I went with him. Anyone got any good Australia/US expat tax agents, I'd love to know!
Oh well, I guess there's an upside. The US tax bill is a good chance to consolidate your US residence, which would strengthen your case if you ever chose to claim US citizenship. I guess in the beginning everyone has a certain amount of back&forth travel when first establishing their residence in the US. It is after all a life-changing event, and most people would still have various ends to tie up in their previous country. I don't know how immigration will look at green card holders though, if they would go back and forth in subsequent years. I guess it shouldn't be an issue if your main stay (and ultimate tax payment) is in the US. It's not unheard of that Green card holders hold international job assignments. I don't know any good tax agents, but hope you find a better one!
 

SusieQQQ

Well-Known Member
Oh well, I guess there's an upside. The US tax bill is a good chance to consolidate your US residence, which would strengthen your case if you ever chose to claim US citizenship. I guess in the beginning everyone has a certain amount of back&forth travel when first establishing their residence in the US. It is after all a life-changing event, and most people would still have various ends to tie up in their previous country. I don't know how immigration will look at green card holders though, if they would go back and forth in subsequent years. I guess it shouldn't be an issue if your main stay (and ultimate tax payment) is in the US. It's not unheard of that Green card holders hold international job assignments. I don't know any good tax agents, but hope you find a better one!
There are very specific continuous residence and physical presence requirements for citizenship, which you should probably make yourself familiar with once you do get your green card if you think that’s a route you want to go down one day. It’s possible to be able to maintain your green card indefinitely without ever managing to quite meet the naturalization requirements. Apart from actual residence, taxation is basically a given as you are expected to file as a resident, and one needs to demonstrate good moral character too (this goes beyond actually committing a crime, for example you cannot get citizenship if you have outstanding child support payments even if there is no court order for such).
 
There are very specific continuous residence and physical presence requirements for citizenship, which you should probably make yourself familiar with once you do get your green card if you think that’s a route you want to go down one day. It’s possible to be able to maintain your green card indefinitely without ever managing to quite meet the naturalization requirements. Apart from actual residence, taxation is basically a given as you are expected to file as a resident, and one needs to demonstrate good moral character too (this goes beyond actually committing a crime, for example you cannot get citizenship if you have outstanding child support payments even if there is no court order for such).
Yes, that sounds fair. I guess I'll research into it. Thanks for the tips.
 
Thanks guys. Also, I saw someone ranting above. Just know that some of us are grateful for your advice and appreciate that you're people with your own lives, who don't need to spend your time answering newbie questions!
 
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