DV 2018 OC Selectees

Hi guys - one quick question.

The address I wanted my green card sent to has changed due to the person moving. I was wondering if I needed to change my address before entering the country to activate or if i can do that at the time of activation? I'll be activating in 3 weeks.
 

Sm1smom

Super Moderator
Hi guys - one quick question.

The address I wanted my green card sent to has changed due to the person moving. I was wondering if I needed to change my address before entering the country to activate or if i can do that at the time of activation? I'll be activating in 3 weeks.
Update/change the address at the POE.
 
I just moved to the US. Everything at the port of entry was fine and the officer was genuinely friendly and lovely.

Has anyone else that moved receive a letter stating they must pay $200 to receive their green card? It was directly from immigration and I’m confused as I haven’t heard much about this happening to others.
 
I just moved to the US. Everything at the port of entry was fine and the officer was genuinely friendly and lovely.

Has anyone else that moved receive a letter stating they must pay $200 to receive their green card? It was directly from immigration and I’m confused as I haven’t heard much about this happening to others.
There is a $220 USCIS Immigrant Fee payable before the permanent resident card will be issued. This fee is payable either before immigrating to the USA or upon entry.
 
Is that separate to the fee I paid at the consulate when I had my interview?
Yes, that is in addition to the $330 payable at the consulate for your interview. I can't seem to add links to external websites but you can check BritSimon's blog for details on all the fees. Just search for "DV lottery fees" and it will break down all the costs.
 
I just moved to the US. Everything at the port of entry was fine and the officer was genuinely friendly and lovely.

Has anyone else that moved receive a letter stating they must pay $200 to receive their green card? It was directly from immigration and I’m confused as I haven’t heard much about this happening to others.
Hey KishOC, did you receive this letter in the mail after you entered the US? I just entered 3 days ago and I wasn't asked to pay anything at the POE in LA. I asked the immigration officer and he said to pay online for the green card to be sent out. I'm struggling to do that because I don't know what my 'DOS number' is...
 

SusieQQQ

Well-Known Member
your DOS number is your case number.
https://www.uscis.gov/forms/uscis-immigrant-fee

In related news, I paid the fee before entry. It took exactly one month (today) for it to tick over from pending after arrival to ‘approved’ and the card is now ordered to be produced. Someone’s still working at the USCIS despite the govt shutdown.
USCIS is mostly fee based, not dependent on the federal funds affected by the shutdown. It’s because you pay that fee that they are still working.
 
Hi, just wondering if I can pick the brains of those who have gone before! How have those who have moved over with their kids gone? I am concerned about how my 11 and 15 year old will adjust to all the changes. Would love to hear from those who have already made the move!
 

EmilyW

Well-Known Member
I have a 14 and 12 year old (11 and 9 when we moved over).

Kids are resilient but there is still a period of adjustment. As parents, we always framed the move as a big adventure. Our kids are free spirits anyway, so they embraced the idea of an adventure.

Having said that... mine struggled for the first month or so at school. As much as our Aussie education system is lauded, there was ALOT of basic stuff they had not been taught in Oz that was expected knowledge in the US, and they had a small crisis of confidence that they were dumb. But they caught up pretty quickly. Our oldest was able to complete sixth grade in just four months AND win a President's award.

Retaining their identity as Aussies was important to both my kids. They still watch AFL and Union. We make our own food (meat pies, lamingtons, mars bar slices) to keep the connection to home. Especially in those first few weeks, comforts from home are super important.

There are words Americans used that my kids didn't understand at first. I remember my little one coming home in the first week of school saying 'I keep on getting into trouble, mum. My teacher says 'hush' and I don't know what that means'. 'Hush' wasn't a word he'd heard before so he would talk to his classmates, his teacher would tell him to 'hush' and he would keep on talking because he didn't understand the instruction. Lol.

Making friends for my boys was pretty easy. The accent is/was a superpower (especially in the south where we are). And kids are the same the world over. Within weeks, my boys had established friendship groups / connections that they maintain to this day.

Short story: prepare for an adjustment, prepare for a few tears, and prepare for them to go through an experience that will be the making of them. Moving to the US has changed my boys for the better in so many ways.
 

SusieQQQ

Well-Known Member
My kids were 6 and 13. Definitely easier the younger they are, but both settled well and quickly adapted to the very different system. Agree with Emily that the accent is a big draw - and once people start talking, most kids can make friends. TBH I would keep an extra eye on your 15-year old - it’s generally a difficult age anyway and moving (I’m guessing approximately) halfway through high school can be a challenge. Be prepared to give extra emotional support, tutoring if necessary and don’t be afraid to use the high school counselor if needed. The bottom line is kids tend to adjust easier than adults because they go right into a situation (school) that provides them with daily routine, structure, activities, social circle etc. Following from that, I know some people who have moved early in the US summer and regretted it because their kids are at a loss for weeks before school begins. We had both of ours in school within a few weeks of moving and it definitely became easier once they were in.
 
I have a 14 and 12 year old (11 and 9 when we moved over).

Kids are resilient but there is still a period of adjustment. As parents, we always framed the move as a big adventure. Our kids are free spirits anyway, so they embraced the idea of an adventure.

Having said that... mine struggled for the first month or so at school. As much as our Aussie education system is lauded, there was ALOT of basic stuff they had not been taught in Oz that was expected knowledge in the US, and they had a small crisis of confidence that they were dumb. But they caught up pretty quickly. Our oldest was able to complete sixth grade in just four months AND win a President's award.

Retaining their identity as Aussies was important to both my kids. They still watch AFL and Union. We make our own food (meat pies, lamingtons, mars bar slices) to keep the connection to home. Especially in those first few weeks, comforts from home are super important.

There are words Americans used that my kids didn't understand at first. I remember my little one coming home in the first week of school saying 'I keep on getting into trouble, mum. My teacher says 'hush' and I don't know what that means'. 'Hush' wasn't a word he'd heard before so he would talk to his classmates, his teacher would tell him to 'hush' and he would keep on talking because he didn't understand the instruction. Lol.

Making friends for my boys was pretty easy. The accent is/was a superpower (especially in the south where we are). And kids are the same the world over. Within weeks, my boys had established friendship groups / connections that they maintain to this day.

Short story: prepare for an adjustment, prepare for a few tears, and prepare for them to go through an experience that will be the making of them. Moving to the US has changed my boys for the better in so many ways.
Thanks Emily this is very reassuring!
 
My kids were 6 and 13. Definitely easier the younger they are, but both settled well and quickly adapted to the very different system. Agree with Emily that the accent is a big draw - and once people start talking, most kids can make friends. TBH I would keep an extra eye on your 15-year old - it’s generally a difficult age anyway and moving (I’m guessing approximately) halfway through high school can be a challenge. Be prepared to give extra emotional support, tutoring if necessary and don’t be afraid to use the high school counselor if needed. The bottom line is kids tend to adjust easier than adults because they go right into a situation (school) that provides them with daily routine, structure, activities, social circle etc. Following from that, I know some people who have moved early in the US summer and regretted it because their kids are at a loss for weeks before school begins. We had both of ours in school within a few weeks of moving and it definitely became easier once they were in.
Thanks Susie! I think I am more worried than they are!
 
LPR and filing taxes
Background: I went to the US to activate LPR status in Oct 2018 (DV2018 selectee). I departed the US in Nov 2018 (stayed for about 3 weeks) and returned to my home country with the intention of moving permanently to the US in Sep 2019. Yes I am aware of the 1 year window I have to return to avoid any issues.
Question: it's regarding filing of US tax. Do I need to file tax? For which period? If I don't, will it affect my re-entry in Sep this year?
 

SusieQQQ

Well-Known Member
LPR and filing taxes
Background: I went to the US to activate LPR status in Oct 2018 (DV2018 selectee). I departed the US in Nov 2018 (stayed for about 3 weeks) and returned to my home country with the intention of moving permanently to the US in Sep 2019. Yes I am aware of the 1 year window I have to return to avoid any issues.
Question: it's regarding filing of US tax. Do I need to file tax? For which period? If I don't, will it affect my re-entry in Sep this year?
Yes, you pass the "green card test" the day you entered the US. You will dual file for 2018, as a non-resident till the date you entered and as a resident since. And you will, next year, file as a resident for all of 2019. Doesn't matter where you lived or earned; what matters is that you are a LPR.

If you haven't filed tax, it is a mark against you claiming you didn't abandon residency during your lengthy period outside and yes it may be a problem. It is requirement of being a green card holder that you file taxes. Please see the "welcome to the USA" guide you got with your green card and the links it points to on the USCIS website, as to the rights and responsibilities of green card holders. (@Bob22 , may i respectfully suggest you read this too.)
 

SusieQQQ

Well-Known Member
https://www.uscis.gov/green-card/after-green-card-granted/maintaining-permanent-residence

Abandoning Permanent Resident Status
You may also lose your permanent resident status by intentionally abandoning it. You may be found to have abandoned your status if you:

  • Move to another country, intending to live there permanently.
  • Remain outside of the United States for an extended period of time, unless you intended this to be a temporary absence, as shown by:
    • The reason for your trip;
    • How long you intended to be absent from the United States;
    • Any other circumstances of your absence; and
    • Any events that may have prolonged your absence.
    • Note: Obtaining a re-entry permit from USCIS before you leave, or a returning resident visa (SB-1) from a U.S. consulate while abroad, may assist you in showing that you intended only a temporary absence.
  • Fail to file income tax returns while living outside of the United States for any period.
  • Declare yourself a “nonimmigrant” on your U.S. tax returns.
 
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