Traveling Outside the US As Asylee applicant ,Asylee,LPR through Asylum

tinaina

Active Member
Has anyone from travel ban country has left the states with asylee status and no green card?
We're they allowed to come back to states with asylee status and RTD?
 
Hello everyone,
I will like to ask a question, am about to file for my GC through asylum granted, my question is, what document can I use to proof that am physically present for one year in US.
Thanke
 

7of9

Active Member
Hello everyone,
I will like to ask a question, am about to file for my GC through asylum granted, my question is, what document can I use to proof that am physically present for one year in US.
Thanke
1. pay stubs
2. rent lease
3. school registration/attendance record
4. tax statement
5. etc
 

7of9

Active Member
I have got the letter of approval for my asylum but no i94. When did you get your i94?
Why do you need the i94? That is a useless document now that your case was approved. As proof of eligibility to work, use social security card + any other document (EAD automatically sent to your once case approved).

Since my case was approved, I have never used the i94. If you really want it, you have to go to the local uscis office to get it. That is where I got mine. You get it free.
 

tinaina

Active Member
Why do you need the i94? That is a useless document now that your case was approved. As proof of eligibility to work, use social security card + any other document (EAD automatically sent to your once case approved).

Since my case was approved, I have never used the i94. If you really want it, you have to go to the local uscis office to get it. That is where I got mine. You get it free.
Do they send EAD card to me or should I apply for it?

It has been a week after my approval and I haven't gotten any EAD.
 

7of9

Active Member
Do they send EAD card to me or should I apply for it?

It has been a week after my approval and I haven't gotten any EAD.
They automatically send you the EAD. It used to take less than two weeks.
You don't need an EAD either way. Employers can confirm your eligibility to work with e-verify. Give them your social security card and tell them your status. Make sure to go to the nearest Social Security Administration location to get your 'unrestricted' social security card.

+ I got my EAD. I lost it within weeks. I never used it even once!
 

DoubleAA

Registered Users (C)
Why do you need the i94? That is a useless document now that your case was approved. As proof of eligibility to work, use social security card + any other document (EAD automatically sent to your once case approved).

Since my case was approved, I have never used the i94. If you really want it, you have to go to the local uscis office to get it. That is where I got mine. You get it free.
I-94, (Arrival-Departure Record) forms one of two essential documents it document Asylee status - Has a DATE and ASYLUM OFFICE THAT APPROVED THE ASYLUM STATUS

If you are keen, you will notice that DHS issues asylees paper Forms I-94 that evidence their status and employment authorization with a stamp or notation indicating asylee status, such as “asylum granted indefinitely” or the appropriate provision of law (8 CFR 274a .12(a)(5) or INA 208).


The only other document with asylee word is RTD issued to asylees
 

DoubleAA

Registered Users (C)
Why do you need the i94? That is a useless document now that your case was approved. As proof of eligibility to work, use social security card + any other document (EAD automatically sent to your once case approved).

Since my case was approved, I have never used the i94. If you really want it, you have to go to the local uscis office to get it. That is where I got mine. You get it free.
It is also a very important document an asylee’s Form I-94 is a List C document and, unlike other Forms I-94, usually does not contain an expiration date. The asylee will need to present a List B identity document with this Form I-94.
 

DoubleAA

Registered Users (C)
I-94, (Arrival-Departure Record) forms one of two essential documents it document Asylee status - Has a DATE and ASYLUM OFFICE THAT APPROVED THE ASYLUM STATUS eg Arlington Asylum Office (ZAR),Chicago Asylum Office (ZCH), Houston Asylum Office (ZHN), Los Angeles Asylum Office (ZLA), Miami Asylum Office (ZMI), New York Asylum Office (ZNY), Newark Asylum Office (ZNK) and San Francisco Asylum Office (ZSF

If you are keen, you will notice that DHS issues asylees paper Forms I-94 that evidence their status and employment authorization with a stamp or notation indicating asylee status, such as “asylum granted indefinitely” or the appropriate provision of law (8 CFR 274a .12(a)(5) or INA 208).


The only other document with asylee word is RTD issued to asylees
 

7of9

Active Member
DoubleAA. You make valid points. My advice comes from an IJ granted asylum. The judge offers you a letter, signed by him/her. This forms your primary form of evidence for you status. That is the one I used to get 1) SSC 2) i-94 3) GC. 4) Several RTDs. Besides, anyone wanting to confirm your status can always call that phone number to check your status, that is what the Social Security Admin called when I went to collect my social securing card. This is why I have never found the need to use the i94.
 

DoubleAA

Registered Users (C)
Just your RTD and a visa if applicable also for countries that provides visa free for RTD holders it’s recommended to print out from the country’s embassy website the article that indicates that you don’t need a visa to travel to that country
Yes.RTD and Visa if applicable.
 
I know the general rule is that there is no actual rule but a very gray area when it comes to using your COP passport to travel once you become a permanent resident and get a GC. However, while I keep hearing of Asylum GC holders who travel freely with their COP passport, I haven't seen a single instance of anyone actually getting into trouble for doing it. I couldn't find any cases on the internet, either anecdotal or from court documents, of anyone losing their Asylum GC or having citizenship issues for using or renewing their COP passport after becoming a permanent resident. Can anyone point to any factual examples or is this fear out of an abundance of caution?
 
I know the general rule is that there is no actual rule but a very gray area when it comes to using your COP passport to travel once you become a permanent resident and get a GC. However, while I keep hearing of Asylum GC holders who travel freely with their COP passport, I haven't seen a single instance of anyone actually getting into trouble for doing it. I couldn't find any cases on the internet, either anecdotal or from court documents, of anyone losing their Asylum GC or having citizenship issues for using or renewing their COP passport after becoming a permanent resident. Can anyone point to any factual examples or is this fear out of an abundance of caution?
So the thing is that if your COP passport is still valid you can use it to travel but if its expired dont renew it
 

7of9

Active Member
I know the general rule is that there is no actual rule but a very gray area when it comes to using your COP passport to travel once you become a permanent resident and get a GC. However, while I keep hearing of Asylum GC holders who travel freely with their COP passport, I haven't seen a single instance of anyone actually getting into trouble for doing it. I couldn't find any cases on the internet, either anecdotal or from court documents, of anyone losing their Asylum GC or having citizenship issues for using or renewing their COP passport after becoming a permanent resident. Can anyone point to any factual examples or is this fear out of an abundance of caution?
This is a good question. People have been struggling with this issue forever. Your question is about traveling with your COP passport. There is no issue there, you can travel as much as you want, even visit mars :) and back and forth.
Issues arise if you:
1. Renew your COP passport while you are an asylee (or GC holder obtained via asylum). A refugee can't get benefits from old country of persecution, etc
2. Go back to your country of persecution, whether with RTD/renewed COP passport.

Anyway, as long as you can prove/explain all issues during citizenship interview, you can pretty much do anything you want, regardless of fears posted here. Technically, uncle sam is not vindictive...I have never heard of GCs revoked, etc (but that doesn't mean it doesn't happen). Uncle Sam doesn't have the resources, normally....but if they want to, they can always do it. Citizenship cases, they don't do it, unless you are a high profile person, like a Nazi war criminal. Discrepances with asylum usually never lead to you losing your citizenship or GC, although they could potentially prevent you from getting your citizenship.
 
My asylum is based on my sexuality, former religion, and HIV+ status, which makes it impossible for me to live in my own country. I do not fear persecution from the gvt though. I a not planning on going back there at all until after obtaining US citizenship.

But this is what I struggle to understand. If you completely lose the asylee/refugee status once you become a PR, why are you still subject to same limitations as an asylee? You're giving up asylee/refugee status in exchange for PR status, which conveys more benefits, and freedoms. So being penalized for applying for a NP if your country will let you, shouldn't really be an issue anymore as you now enjoy a certain protection by the US as an LPR. Even the adjudication procedures for obtaining a RTD only mention issues of possible "re-availment" if the person is still an asylee/refugee but not if the person already has a GC.

I have found cases where asylum GC holders were removed from the US back to their home country because the definition of asylee/refugee no longer applied to them after getting a GC. So they can't really have it both ways. They can't send asylum GC people back to the country they claimed persecution from because they're no longer a refugee/asylee, and at the same time keep every asylum GC holder hostage to 1-year RTDs because they're still refugees/asylees.
 
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