The "been there done that" thread: life in the US after DV

#41
Thanks for your suggestions @Sm1smom . Of course I´m aware of the need of having a proper health insurance, it´s just that I was concentrated on my child´s immunizations. @SusieQQQ while googling I came up to the NY State Vaccines for Children Program where results seem to be the same as your search above:
https://www.health.ny.gov/prevention/immunization/vaccines_for_children.htm

A child is eligible for VFC vaccine if he or she is younger than 19 years of age and meets at least one of the following criteria:

  • Medicaid-enrolled (includes both fee-for-service and managed care)
  • Uninsured
  • Underinsured
    • A child who has commercial health insurance but the coverage does not include vaccines, a child whose insurance covers only selected vaccines (VFC-eligible for non-covered vaccines only), or a child whose insurance caps vaccine coverage at a certain amount or number of visits (VFC-eligible once that cap is exceeded). Underinsured children are eligible to receive VFC vaccine only through a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC). New York State allows private providers to vaccinate underinsured children using state-funded vaccine.
A list of VFC Providers (health centers / clinics) and addresses is missing in this website though.
 

Sm1smom

Super Moderator
#42
Thanks for your suggestions @Sm1smom . Of course I´m aware of the need of having a proper health insurance, it´s just that I was concentrated on my child´s immunizations. @SusieQQQ while googling I came up to the NY State Vaccines for Children Program where results seem to be the same as your search above:
https://www.health.ny.gov/prevention/immunization/vaccines_for_children.htm

A list of VFC Providers (health centers / clinics) and addresses is missing in this website though.
It actually took me less than one minute to come up with a link to a list of some public health department places NYC.

http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/html/living/immun-clinics.shtml

Now NY is obviously a very large city. You may need to be a bit creative when carrying out your search. You can for instance type in the name of the city/ county where you're or will be based in addition to "public health department" to come up with a precise list. In the alternative, visit your public library for more information.
 

SusieQQQ

Well-Known Member
#43
Thanks for your suggestions @Sm1smom . Of course I´m aware of the need of having a proper health insurance, it´s just that I was concentrated on my child´s immunizations. @SusieQQQ while googling I came up to the NY State Vaccines for Children Program where results seem to be the same as your search above:
https://www.health.ny.gov/prevention/immunization/vaccines_for_children.htm

A child is eligible for VFC vaccine if he or she is younger than 19 years of age and meets at least one of the following criteria:

  • Medicaid-enrolled (includes both fee-for-service and managed care)
  • Uninsured
  • Underinsured
    • A child who has commercial health insurance but the coverage does not include vaccines, a child whose insurance covers only selected vaccines (VFC-eligible for non-covered vaccines only), or a child whose insurance caps vaccine coverage at a certain amount or number of visits (VFC-eligible once that cap is exceeded). Underinsured children are eligible to receive VFC vaccine only through a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC). New York State allows private providers to vaccinate underinsured children using state-funded vaccine.
A list of VFC Providers (health centers / clinics) and addresses is missing in this website though.
What confuses me slightly, is that your child's vaccinations should be up to date as of now to get the visa. So you are looking ahead?
 

Banangeh

Active Member
#45
Maybe mods can make this sticky. I think it'll be worthwhile- it's always interesting to see the progress other people have made when you are on a similar path. The idea is to add links to blogs etc here rather than fill this thread with posts. The ones below are the ones I am aware of/can remember ... Apologies if I forgot anyone but please add on.

CrawfinUSA - an Aussie in Maine: http://crawfinusa.com

Guriix - a Kenyan in Houston http://guriixusjourney.wordpress.com

Britsimon - a Brit in NorCal http://britsimonsays.com
am adding mine soon
 

Banangeh

Active Member
#46
No it's not the correct thread and the question has been asked and answered numerous times. The U.S. is not a police state. Once you have an immigrant visa you can go to any of the 50 states you choose.
I agree with you was to go to South carolina but came to TX
 
#47
Has anyone tried using international auto source to purchase/finance a vehicle ? Supposedly they are focused on expats relocating into the US with no credit and negotiate on behalf of the expat , with the dealerships. Appreciate if anyone can share their experience -if any. Thanks
 

SusieQQQ

Well-Known Member
#48
Has anyone tried using international auto source to purchase/finance a vehicle ? Supposedly they are focused on expats relocating into the US with no credit and negotiate on behalf of the expat , with the dealerships. Appreciate if anyone can share their experience -if any. Thanks
I haven't personally but know someone who used a similar company (maybe even the same). Helps if you are not too fussy about your car as it has to come from stock somewhere (so you can't custom order), but he did get a good price on the car. More important - the person I know who did this had to have a job first in the U.S. to get the financing - so I am not sure this works so well for DV in general as I think most of us don't have a job lined up before we move.
 
#51
Dear all,

I am a LPR since January, 2015. In February, 2015, I returned to my home country in order to finish my studies. I will return to the U.S. in September, 2015. Thus, I will be absent from the U.S. for more than six months (but less than a year). I would like to ask you, if my entry to the U.S. might be denied due to the long absence? Do you have any experience, related to this issue?
 
#52
Dear all,

I am a LPR since January, 2015. In February, 2015, I returned to my home country in order to finish my studies. I will return to the U.S. in September, 2015. Thus, I will be absent from the U.S. for more than six months (but less than a year). I would like to ask you, if my entry to the U.S. might be denied due to the long absence? Do you have any experience, related to this issue?
No you will be fine. Just explain IF ASKED that you went to complete your studies. You probably won't even be asked.
 

Sm1smom

Super Moderator
#53
Dear all,

I am a LPR since January, 2015. In February, 2015, I returned to my home country in order to finish my studies. I will return to the U.S. in September, 2015. Thus, I will be absent from the U.S. for more than six months (but less than a year). I would like to ask you, if my entry to the U.S. might be denied due to the long absence? Do you have any experience, related to this issue?
Your entry will not be denied, you should be okay. They understand the need for new immigrants to go back home and tie up loose ends which could take some time to complete.
 
#54
Thank you for your replies. Actually, the U.S. Customs and Border Protection agency clearly states that:

LPRs that are out of the U.S. for more than 180 days are subject to new immigrant inspection procedures as per 8 USC 1101.

If we look at "8 USC 1101", we see:

(a)(13)(C)(ii) An alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence in the United States shall not be regarded as seeking an admission into the United States for purposes of the immigration laws unless the alien - has been absent from the United States for a continuous period in excess of 180 days.

Do you have any ideas about the "new immigrant inspection procedures"? Does it mean that, for example, a LPR, who was absent from the U.S. for more than six months (but less than a year), has to pass the medical exam again?
 

Britsimon

Super Moderator
#55
Thank you for your replies. Actually, the U.S. Customs and Border Protection agency clearly states that:

LPRs that are out of the U.S. for more than 180 days are subject to new immigrant inspection procedures as per 8 USC 1101.

If we look at "8 USC 1101", we see:

(a)(13)(C)(ii) An alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence in the United States shall not be regarded as seeking an admission into the United States for purposes of the immigration laws unless the alien - has been absent from the United States for a continuous period in excess of 180 days.

Do you have any ideas about the "new immigrant inspection procedures"? Does it mean that, for example, a LPR, who was absent from the U.S. for more than six months (but less than a year), has to pass the medical exam again?
You are getting yourself worked up for nothing.....
 

SusieQQQ

Well-Known Member
#56
Thank you for your replies. Actually, the U.S. Customs and Border Protection agency clearly states that:

LPRs that are out of the U.S. for more than 180 days are subject to new immigrant inspection procedures as per 8 USC 1101.

If we look at "8 USC 1101", we see:

(a)(13)(C)(ii) An alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence in the United States shall not be regarded as seeking an admission into the United States for purposes of the immigration laws unless the alien - has been absent from the United States for a continuous period in excess of 180 days.

Do you have any ideas about the "new immigrant inspection procedures"? Does it mean that, for example, a LPR, who was absent from the U.S. for more than six months (but less than a year), has to pass the medical exam again?
These "new" procedures have been around for a good few years now. I think at least 5, possibly more.
According to the scare-people-attorneys it means you risk losing your green card if you are out longer than 6 months (hence "seeking an admission" after that time) but the rest of the uscis stuff talks about 12 months as the critical time period and this is what you need to worry about. Only in terms of losing your green card/LPR status. You'd only need to redo medicals if you went for another immigrant visa, having been out of the U.S. longer than a year and lost your green card as a result.
 
#57
Hello. My sister intends to enter the US in August, vacation for about three weeks, and go back to Singapore before moving here permanently. Per your advice, she will enter as an immigrant in August. How long can she stay outside of the US without being considered to have abandoned her GC? Can she continue working in Singapore for a few weeks to tie up loose ends before moving here permanently?
 
#58
Hello. My sister intends to enter the US in August, vacation for about three weeks, and go back to Singapore before moving here permanently. Per your advice, she will enter as an immigrant in August. How long can she stay outside of the US without being considered to have abandoned her GC? Can she continue working in Singapore for a few weeks to tie up loose ends before moving here permanently?
If she is a new immigrant, she can stay out for up to 12 months (careful not to over do it). They do understand that you need to sort your stuff out. Even then you can come back, stay a while, and either apply for a White Passport,( I131) which gives you up to 2 years permit to be absent or leave and come back within 6 months.
 
#60
Just a reminder that until you are a citizen, you need to notify USCIS within 10 days of a change of address.
I am doing POE and will stay for 10 days, and then leave for a few months. Should I alert USCIS of that address change even though it's a rental, and what happens after I leave and am no longer in the U.S.?
 
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