Chicago interview decisions.

#21
Did they give a reason? Very strange to hear this. I don't your case, but my understanding is that even folks applying from good countries have a chance at getting help to fight their case. My advice is that see whats making them reject your case. Most pro bono lawyers would take the case, regardless of the merits of the case. If there is something fundamentally flawed with your case, that is no reason for them to reject you. If the flaw they are seeing is too big, consider moving forward with your case, minus the flaw somehow. Good luck!
 

BetterWorld

Registered Users (C)
#22
Thank you for the encouragement. To answer your question, after the interview in the Chicago AO, the IO told me to go back two weeks after for the decision.

I keep looking for an attorney, but so far no one wanted to take my case. After an intake interview, they all told me that they did not have the capacity to take my case. I am lost now not knowing what to do. I cannot afford a private attorney at the moment. i will have the second master hearing in Sept 2019 because i did not have a legal representation in the first master hearing. it was like automatic that the judge wanted us to come back with an attorney. i might have to represent myself during the second master hearing.

based on the first hearing, those with an attorney got assigned their individual hearing dates in jan 2022! that is insanely a long time to wait for a hearing.
That means people are getting individual hearing after 3 years?? Really?
LIFO systems working??

How about other guys?
 
#24
That means people are getting individual hearing after 3 years?? Really?
LIFO systems working??

How about other guys?
This is no surprise here. I got my hearing 16 months later! And that was back in 2008. I can only imagine the backlog is even longer now. So three year wait for the hearing is no surprise. Which is heartbreaking!!! Three years of waiting, without a guarantee of success is painful. On top of that, when the judge gives an continuance like that, the clock stops...meaning one can spend three years waiting for a hearing....without an EAD, so unable to work. Three plus years of lost productivity is super super painful.
 

BetterWorld

Registered Users (C)
#25
This is no surprise here. I got my hearing 16 months later! And that was back in 2008. I can only imagine the backlog is even longer now. So three year wait for the hearing is no surprise. Which is heartbreaking!!! Three years of waiting, without a guarantee of success is painful. On top of that, when the judge gives an continuance like that, the clock stops...meaning one can spend three years waiting for a hearing....without an EAD, so unable to work. Three plus years of lost productivity is super super painful.
I know its sad :(

Guys, Please share your experiences on Master & then Individual hearings experiences & timelines.
 

CWH

Active Member
#27
This is no surprise here. I got my hearing 16 months later! And that was back in 2008. I can only imagine the backlog is even longer now. So three year wait for the hearing is no surprise. Which is heartbreaking!!! Three years of waiting, without a guarantee of success is painful. On top of that, when the judge gives an continuance like that, the clock stops...meaning one can spend three years waiting for a hearing....without an EAD, so unable to work. Three plus years of lost productivity is super super painful.
yes, when i first heard of it in the courtroom, i was terrified. but i didn’t know that we could no longer renew our EAD card!!!!! that is a new information for me and i am worried. how will i survive without working. so, the EAD card will no longer valid as soon as i got an individual hearing date? what if there are times left on the EAD card before it expires?
 
#28
yes, when i first heard of it in the courtroom, i was terrified. but i didn’t know that we could no longer renew our EAD card!!!!! that is a new information for me and i am worried. how will i survive without working. so, the EAD card will no longer valid as soon as i got an individual hearing date? what if there are times left on the EAD card before it expires?
I don't think that is correct.

You should ask an asylum lawyer that information.
 

CWH

Active Member
#29
I don't think that is correct.

You should ask an asylum lawyer that information.
i also thought the info was not correct. i googled and found an article from NIJC, trustworthy non-profit organization helping immigrants and what not.
https://immigrantjustice.org/sites/...ents/2018-04/Appendix N - EAD FAQ_04 2018.pdf
for Q7, Q8, Q9, if asylum seekers who have been referred to IJ did not cause delay in the process, the clock will not stop.

I wonder the clock would mean anything at this point since i had waited more than 3 years for the interview. i am in my third EAD, not the initial one anymore.
 
#30
The document that you have shared doesn't mention that the clock stops when you're referred to the Immigration Judge.

On the contrary, it states that the clock continues to run even though you're referred to an immigration judge. Therefore you can renew your EAD.

The Exception here, is that the clock stops, only when the applicant misses his appointment either with the Asylum officer or the judge.
 

CWH

Active Member
#31
The document that you have shared doesn't mention that the clock stops when you're referred to the Immigration Judge.

On the contrary, it states that the clock continues to run even though you're referred to an immigration judge. Therefore you can renew your EAD.

The Exception here, is that the clock stops, only when the applicant misses his appointment either with the Asylum officer or the judge.
exactly! so we are still able to renew our EAD cards while waiting for an individual hearing.
 
#33
I think you guys are mixing up two things:
1. Referral to an immigration judge does NOT stop the clock.
2. However, if there is ever a 'continuance' which I referred to in my message, the clock stops. In the old days, cases were referred to the IJ quickly (mine was aorund 9 weeks), so by the time of my first master hearing, my clock was around 60 days. But because me and my lawyers were not ready to argue our case, the judge ordered a 'continuance' of 16 months!. During that whole 16 months waiting for our next hearing, my clock was stopped at 60 days. I was unable to apply for an EAD....so I couldn't work.

It's different for you guys, since the delay is scheduling before the first hearing. Delays after the first hearing stop the clock, that is what I meant.
 

BetterWorld

Registered Users (C)
#34
i also thought the info was not correct. i googled and found an article from NIJC, trustworthy non-profit organization helping immigrants and what not.
https://immigrantjustice.org/sites/default/files/content-type/resource/documents/2018-04/Appendix N - EAD FAQ_04 2018.pdf
for Q7, Q8, Q9, if asylum seekers who have been referred to IJ did not cause delay in the process, the clock will not stop.

I wonder the clock would mean anything at this point since i had waited more than 3 years for the interview. i am in my third EAD, not the initial one anymore.
Was it for 2 years or 1 year at first renewal or 2nd renewal?
 

BetterWorld

Registered Users (C)
#35
It's different for you guys, since the delay is scheduling before the first hearing. Delays after the first hearing stop the clock, that is what I meant.
Thats i guess the rule from beginning of any Asylum case...Whenever you request to delay processing/or processing stops due to anything missing from your side, Clock stops.
Is my understanding correct?
 

CWH

Active Member
#38
I think you guys are mixing up two things:
1. Referral to an immigration judge does NOT stop the clock.
2. However, if there is ever a 'continuance' which I referred to in my message, the clock stops. In the old days, cases were referred to the IJ quickly (mine was aorund 9 weeks), so by the time of my first master hearing, my clock was around 60 days. But because me and my lawyers were not ready to argue our case, the judge ordered a 'continuance' of 16 months!. During that whole 16 months waiting for our next hearing, my clock was stopped at 60 days. I was unable to apply for an EAD....so I couldn't work.

It's different for you guys, since the delay is scheduling before the first hearing. Delays after the first hearing stop the clock, that is what I meant.

it sounded, at least to me, that you referred to the assignment of the individual hearing in 3 years as “a continuance like that”, in your original post below:
Three years of waiting, without a guarantee of success is painful. On top of that, when the judge gives an continuance like that, the clock stops...meaning one can spend three years waiting for a hearing....without an EAD, so unable to work.

anyway, it is all good that your post actually pushed me to verify and make sure that we do not lose EAD eligibility if we did not attempt to slow down the process in anyway but to let it take its normal course/timeframe. it’s not fun to wait at all but we can do so much!
 
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