Citizenship for adopted son

1HappyDad

New Member
I am a U.S. citizen living in the Philippines. My wife is dual U.S./Philippines citizen. We have been living here for 8 years. We legally adopted my wifes nephew. We have had him since he was 1 day old. He is now 8. The adoption date was July 24, 2018. His birth certificate and passport here in the Philippines has our last name. His Philippine passport has a U.S. multiple entry 10 year visa. He was with us in the states (New York)for the month of February 2020. I will be 62 in Nov of 2022 and will start collecting Social Security.

What is the best way to get him U.S. citizenship as quickly as possible? I can file the N600K but the U.S. Embassy here in the Philippines is not processing anything due to Covid. Who knows how long they will be closed. Oddly enough, normally here, in the case of adoptions, the Embassy only issues a visa for the child in question to travel to Guam or the States for the interview and to be sworn in. My son already has a visa and can travel to the states for the interview. Could I file an N600 and use my New York address? I do not want to lie. My son is the most important thing in my life.

Also, we are in the process of adopting his biological sister. She is 10. We will be going thru the same thing again in 2 years. (TOTALLY WORTH IT)

Thanks for any advice.

Steve
 

1HappyDad

New Member
We will be probably be here for at least 2 more years. Perhaps longer. I want his citizenship done ASAP for 2 reasons. The first is Covid. The world has changed and borders are closed and having that blue passport allows him access anywhere we need to go in an emergency. The other reason is my Social Security. I will start to collect in Nov 2022 and as a U.S. citizen he is entitled to a Social Security number. Once he has an S.S. number he is entitled to monthly benefits until the age of 18.
 

newacct

Well-Known Member
Since you guys plan to continue residing abroad, the proper way to get him citizenship is the INA 322 naturalization process by filing N-600K, rather than petitioning him to immigrate with I-130. N-600K is filed with USCIS, and then they ask him to go to the US for interview and oath. He can use the visa he already has to enter the US for the interview and oath.
 

1HappyDad

New Member
Thank You for replying. I just don't want to get delayed by having them send the paperwork here to the Embassy in Manila since all services are closed and he doesn't need a visa. The N600K form asks what location is preferred for the interview so I can say New York. I have to look at the N600K form and see if I should put my New York address on it or put my address here in the Philippines. I'd rather use the New York address if allowed and completely leave the Philippines out of it.
 

1HappyDad

New Member
I always thought that Embassy's were considered property of the country they represent so I don't understand why people have to travel to Guam or the States to be interviewed and sworn in. It certainly makes it harder on people.
 

newacct

Well-Known Member
N-600K interviews and oaths must take place in the US, after the child has been admitted in a nonimmigrant status. You don't have to worry about it taking place in an embassy. (The Philippines is not a country that the USCIS has an international office in, and even for those international offices, they do not conduct N-600K interviews, as those must be done in the US.) The INA 322 naturalization process (with N-600K) requires that the child be residing abroad, so I am not sure you can put a New York address.
 
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