Terribly worried 15 years after becoming US Citizen

axter

New Member
Here's my story:

2000 - Grandparents sponsored their children (including my mom), I'm the grandson. Came to the US with green card.
2003 - Received driver license, shortly after got a speeding ticket.

I was so afraid of my family that I did not disclose this information to them. I took traffic courses and paid the fine (which was between $120-$130, it has been so long to remember).

2005 - Became US Citizen at 20 years old. I was still a kid then, my family did all the application (N-400). And since they didn't know about my traffic ticket (because I didn't tell them), I'm 100% sure that they didn't disclose it on the N-400 form. At my interview, I am 98% sure that the officer didn't ask about traffic tickets. The interview was short and went very smoothly.

And now to the present, given the news that the government is opening up a task force / department to denaturalize naturalized citizens for the most serious crimes (terrorism, rape etc...), I'm a bit afraid that it could happen to me. Obviously not disclosing a traffic ticket is not those crimes but still... You know about this administration.

In 2017, the Supreme Court unanimously voted that the government cannot strip citizenship because of minor lies or omissions during naturalization process. One could withheld it due being too embarrassed (my case) or whatever the reasons might be.

I'm afraid still and would like to hear your thoughts...

Thank you very much for your prompt responses.
 

axter

New Member
Anything guys?

Just a few words of reassurance/advice would mean the world to me right now...
 

newacct

Well-Known Member
According to that Supreme Court case you are referring to (Maslenjak v. United States), denaturalization can only be for false statements that were material, i.e. that would have led to you being disqualified for naturalization. And speeding tickets generally never affect naturalization if disclosed, so they are not material. In fact, during the argument of that case, Chief Justice Roberts asked whether lying about a speeding ticket would have been grounds for denaturalization, and when the government lawyer responded yes, he responded "Oh, come on".
 

axter

New Member
So is this omission material? I don’t believe so right because it wouldn’t have mattered (traffic ticket is such a minor and non-criminal offense) at that time anyway. Please correct me if I’m wrong.
 

axter

New Member
According to that Supreme Court case you are referring to (Maslenjak v. United States), denaturalization can only be for false statements that were material, i.e. that would have led to you being disqualified for naturalization. And speeding tickets generally never affect naturalization if disclosed, so they are not material. In fact, during the argument of that case, Chief Justice Roberts asked whether lying about a speeding ticket would have been grounds for denaturalization, and when the government lawyer responded yes, he responded "Oh, come on".

Ok I got it now. Thank you for confirming!
 
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