Post Oath Ceremony--Did Not Realize About My Traffic Ticket Until Everything Was Done.

yuzu1009

Registered Users (C)
#1
I had my citizenship interview and the Oath Ceremony on a same day, and got the certificate and everything.
I, however, did not realize that I made a big mistake until much later that day.

Here is the explanation:

I had a five-year-old (or older) minor traffic ticket--for which I paid the fine in full--
but had totally forgotten about that.

I had this experience tucked away so deep in my memory, I did not remember this until, quite by accident, reading someone's post about n-400.

Consequently, nothing about this ticket was disclosed during the entire process of naturalization. I was so confident that I had nothing on me even during the interview for I TRULY believed that was the case.

Now, I would like to seek some advice from my fellow applicants about this.

Do I report to USCIS office about what had happened?
This was an honest (and unbelievably stupid) mistake of my part, I'd like to make it right if I could before
it's too late.

Is there anyone who had a similar experience? Such as not disclosing the traffic tickets during the entire application procedure?
Any word of advice will be greatly appreciated, but please go easy on criticisms or scary warnings...
for I am already bewildered by my own enormous stupidity.

Thanks in advance.

yuzu
 

Vorpal

Registered Users (C)
#4
Is there anyone who had a similar experience? Such as not disclosing the traffic tickets during the entire application procedure?
I didn't disclose any traffic tickets on my N-400, but brought proof of payment for the ones that haven't yet been wiped from my record to the interview, just in caser the IO specifically asked about traffic tickets. The IO only asked if I've ever been arrested. I truthfully answered that I've never been arrested and became a citizen about a month later.

This is a non-issue. The USCIS doesn't care about minor traffic tickets. Enjoy your newly-acquired citizenship.
 

JPBoston

Registered Users (C)
#5
Not an issue. My traffic ticket which I paid a fine for and which I mentioned on my N-400 was changed by my interviewer to being a no (to the question of whether I had ever been cited ... I had answered yes). She told me that traffic tickets did not apply to this question. Ignore this and move on with your new life as a US citizen. Congrats!
 

yuzu1009

Registered Users (C)
#6
Dear cafeconleche, Jackolantern, Vorpal , and JPBoston,

Thank you very much for your willingness to take time and reply; it is much, much appreciated.

This is a quick post to thank you guys for your kindness.
Let me reply to each one of you tonight. Now, off to the dentist appointment...!
I'll be back.

Thanks!!!
 

yuzu1009

Registered Users (C)
#7
Forget about this ticket.

>cafeconleche
Although when it comes to stupidity I'm quite sure my situation is by far the stupidest one in the century , but I guess I'm not the only one who makes this kind of mistake.

The chances of this ever coming back to bite me in the tail is next to none, but I sure wish I had done it right.


Thank you very much for your reply. I appreciate it.

-y
 

yuzu1009

Registered Users (C)
#8
>Jackolantern
Thank you kindly for your replying. It is much appreciated.

No, I was not arrested.
I simply got a ticket and paid the fine, but for the life of me cannot remember what year that happened let alone the exact date: about five years or so ago.

A lot happened during the last several years in my personal life, and the hardship alone was severe enough for me to pretty much block much memories of what happened during those years from getting retrieved; everything is still pretty much a hazy blur.

-y
 

yuzu1009

Registered Users (C)
#9
I didn't disclose any traffic tickets on my N-400, but brought proof of payment for the ones that haven't yet been wiped from my record to the interview, just in caser the IO specifically asked about traffic tickets. The IO only asked if I've ever been arrested. I truthfully answered that I've never been arrested and became a citizen about a month later.

This is a non-issue. The USCIS doesn't care about minor traffic tickets. Enjoy your newly-acquired citizenship.

>Vorpal

Thank you for sharing your experience; it is much appreciated.
I suppose there isn't much good in brooding over this; what's done is done.
Life's too short, and I've lived much too long in this country to stop being upbeat and cease to live. ;-)

-y
 

yuzu1009

Registered Users (C)
#10
Not an issue. My traffic ticket which I paid a fine for and which I mentioned on my N-400 was changed by my interviewer to being a no (to the question of whether I had ever been cited ... I had answered yes). She told me that traffic tickets did not apply to this question. Ignore this and move on with your new life as a US citizen. Congrats!
>JPBoston

Thank you very much for your encouraging words.
I realize now that it is rather silly, at this point, to be paranoid unless you're planning to become a super-famous, powerful, and notorious individual with lots of enemies: enemies who are willing to dig up some dirty laundry on you. I have led so far a modest simple life, so that's what I shall continue to do;-)

-y
 

Marusia_GC

Registered Users (C)
#11
Parking ticket before oath

I had very similar situation. Just before the oath ceremony I got a parking ticket at my University. It was repairs on the parking lot near the building where I work, and I was advised by e-mail from the University police department that everyone should park on the different parking lot. They sent the stickers with delay, though, so when I parked on the new place I did not have a new sticker yet. Somehow I got a ticket for 10 dollars. I immediately paid it just because I was afraid that I need to tell about it at the oath, but submitted an appeal that this fine was unfair. At the oath I decided not to reveal this case, since I thought it was minor, and anyway unfair. This was in late July, and in December my appeal was satisfied and fine was reimbursed. Still I feel kind of guilty that I had hidden this ticket. I hope I do not need to do anything now, and cannot do, I hope I am Ok, but can this thing come up and hurt me later some day? Anyway, this was not the city, it was local University police, and as far as I know this ticket has never been reported to the city police. Also, can anyone prove that it was I who parked the car, but not my son, for example?
 

JPBoston

Registered Users (C)
#12
Marusia_GC, you are unnecessarily stressing on an unimportant event that has no bearing on your citizenship. Relax and forget about it all.
 

Jackolantern

Registered Users (C)
#13
There is a very high burden of proof on the government if they want to revoke citizenship, much higher than what it takes to deny citizenship. Nobody is going to get their citizenship revoked because of a parking ticket or speeding ticket which has been paid and involved no arrest.
 
Top