OCI versus 10 year Multiple Entry Visa?

jac2005

Registered Users (C)
#1
So I have been trying to decide between an OCI and just a regular 10 year visa. The OCI costs twice as much but appears to be valid lifelong. Are there any other specific benefits to an OCI that I might have need of?

1. I think you can stay indefinitely in India with a OCI sticker whereas its limited to 180 days with a visa. But I really don't see myself staying more than a month at a time in India.
2. Also says that an OCI has "Parity with NRIs (Non-Resident Indians) in financial, economic and educational fields". So I guess I could own stocks, do business and perhaps study in India if I chose. I doubt if I will ever end up doing any of that.
3. If I am a beneficiary to some family property, will my being a US citizen without an OCI disqualify me from inheriting family property?

So any reason for me to go OCI instead of just a 10 year multiple entry visa? Am I overlooking some benefit here? Let me know.

Thanks,
Jake
 
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s.kumar73

Registered Users (C)
#2
Well, it certainly is your personal choice what to apply for. OCI is certainly preferable as it carries more benefits, just in case your interest in India changes as time goes by. With long term visitor visa, you won't legally be able to do anything else e.g. work/study etc.

Regards,

Kumar
 

jac2005

Registered Users (C)
#3
So as a US citizen and WITHOUT an OCI can I have property and bank accounts in my name? I am beneficiary to my family property and also have bank accounts since a long time. Am I legally allowed to have those anymore?
 

nkm-oct23

Registered Users (C)
#4
If you once held Indian citizenship you are considered a PIO for Indian tax and investment purposes (with or without a PIO card or OCI card) and as a PIO you can hold residential or commercial property and inherit residential, commercial or agricultural property. There is a restriction that you can sell it only to an Indian citizen or a PIO.

In your case an OCI or PIO card is not required to buy or sell non-agricultural property in India or inherit any property (don't throw away your old Indian passports!)

An OCI card or PIO card is just a permanent visa/residence card for India and allows you to travel to, work, study and live in India for as long as you want. PIO card has the added annoyance that it is more expensive, needs to be renewed every 15 years and one needs to report to Indian police every 6 months beyond the first 6 months of stay.
 
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TheRealist

Registered Users (C)
#5
PIO card has the added annoyance that it is more expensive, needs to be renewed every 15 years and one needs to report to Indian police every 6 months beyond the first 6 months of stay.
Not to mention that the PIO card also costs a bit more compared to OCI! Go figure.
 

nkm-oct23

Registered Users (C)
#6
Also as a Person of Indian Origin one can open NRI accounts in India; one doesn't need an OCI/PIO card in order to do this. NRIs and PIOs are treated on par in this matter.
 

shanchak

Registered Users (C)
#7
Indian Govt pension

I have some questions regarding the rights of OCI cars holder.
Is there any legal issue in getting the Govt pension (State / central govt) once the person becomes US citizen?
Then does OCI status helps ?
Thanks
 

nkm-oct23

Registered Users (C)
#9
Yes, there was an insert included in My OCI package which said that we need to take both US passport with U visa sticker AND the OCI booklet when traveling to India.
 

jac2005

Registered Users (C)
#10
If you once held Indian citizenship you are considered a PIO for Indian tax and investment purposes (with or without a PIO card or OCI card) and as a PIO you can hold residential or commercial property and inherit residential, commercial or agricultural property. There is a restriction that you can sell it only to an Indian citizen or a PIO.
So I guess I should be ok in that case with just a visa instead of going through the process of an OCI. Thanks for your advice. I still have a few days to think about it while my US passport is being processed.
 

jac2005

Registered Users (C)
#11
Looking at the process for an OCI, I now think that going through the OCI route once may not be that bad. Costs around 100$ more but gives a lot of privileges especially if you still have assets connected to your name back home...thanks for everyone's feedback!!
 

sam99

Registered Users (C)
#12
I think getting an OCI has some disadvantage too. Suppose if you travel abroad and you get stuck with legal issues and it might be possible they can go to weaker govt (which is india) for any prosecution concerns as you have dual citizenship (US and india). If US govt is contacted then you have high chances you will be treated right by foreign govt.

So my assumption will be getting an PIO or multiple entry visa is right choice!!
 

nkm-oct23

Registered Users (C)
#13
That is a bogus argument. US government does not consider OCI as a dual citizenship and clearly states that OCI holders continue to be US citizens and are provided full US consular access when overseas.
 
#15
Necessity of POI/OCI card to inherit/hold/sell (non-agriculture) property in India

I find this thread interesting because I am mulling whether to apply for a POI/OCI card for myself and wife or continue with the 10-yr visa we already have

We are both POI as having held indian passports in the past, but these questions of inheriting/buying/selling of property (non-agriculture land/farm house) has gotten us confused -- many people seem to think that a POI/OCI card is necessary -- but your thread was the first to articulate that is not the case. Is there a Govt. of India website that clearly states this as well ?

I think it makes sense to apply for a POI card when your visa needs to be renewed anyway. Not sure why the OCI card is charged less than POI (common sense would dictate otherwise), but an OCI card may create 'perception' issues if you ever apply for security clearance (which tends to be somewhat subjective while assessing ties to your former country of citizenship)

Thanks much
 

idk

Registered Users (C)
#17
I find this thread interesting because I am mulling whether to apply for a POI/OCI card for myself and wife or continue with the 10-yr visa we already have

We are both POI as having held indian passports in the past, but these questions of inheriting/buying/selling of property (non-agriculture land/farm house) has gotten us confused -- many people seem to think that a POI/OCI card is necessary -- but your thread was the first to articulate that is not the case. Is there a Govt. of India website that clearly states this as well ?

I think it makes sense to apply for a POI card when your visa needs to be renewed anyway. Not sure why the OCI card is charged less than POI (common sense would dictate otherwise), but an OCI card may create 'perception' issues if you ever apply for security clearance (which tends to be somewhat subjective while assessing ties to your former country of citizenship)

Thanks much
http://www.rbi.org.in/scripts/FAQView.aspx?Id=33

A previous post on the topic:
http://forums.immigration.com/showthread.php?323376-OCI-Taxes-and-finances
 

ginnu

Registered Users (C)
#19
So I have been trying to decide between an OCI and just a regular 10 year visa. The OCI costs twice as much but appears to be valid lifelong. Are there any other specific benefits to an OCI that I might have need of?

1. I think you can stay indefinitely in India with a OCI sticker whereas its limited to 180 days with a visa. But I really don't see myself staying more than a month at a time in India.
2. Also says that an OCI has "Parity with NRIs (Non-Resident Indians) in financial, economic and educational fields". So I guess I could own stocks, do business and perhaps study in India if I chose. I doubt if I will ever end up doing any of that.
3. If I am a beneficiary to some family property, will my being a US citizen without an OCI disqualify me from inheriting family property?
------------------NO. you can have Visa, PIO, OCI you CAN keep your family property.

So any reason for me to go OCI instead of just a 10 year multiple entry visa? Am I overlooking some benefit here? Let me know.
-----------------OCI is for Life . Visa is not for life. Visa rules may be changed Fees may be changed. if open NRE/ NRO account then OCI proves that you are of India origin. many in India don't understand OCI and still consider you as Indian Citizen according to them OCI is dual citizenship. with OCI one can again get Indian citizenship.
Thanks,
Jake
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#20
Is OCI compulsory now for property transaction if you are a person of Indian origin?

Hope this is not true.

Search for: Notification No. FEMA 21(R) / 2018-B of March 26, 2018

This was published in India Post. I can't provide a url link as I get an error message that it may be spam.
 
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