N400 filing - travel dates - proof - Canada trip and Canada entry date not stamped in passport

janv

New Member
#1
Hi,

I will be eligible to file N400 citizenship in November.
I understood that we need to provide details on all the international travel dates within past 5 years to proof that we did not stay abroad for 6 months or more.
Recently I travelled to Canada on work. I travelled for 4 days. I realized now that I did not get Canada entry stamped while entering in to Canada. The entry stamp is missing in my passport for Canada entry. I do see the entry in to USA stamp by USA immigration when I returned to USA.

Is it going to be a problem if I file N400 with this missing Canada entry Stamp in my passport?
Is it possible to go to Canada consulate to get entry date stamped or is there a way get Canada entry/exit history records?
I checked Canada immigration site and in freedom of information act, it says we can submit for history records only if we are Canada citizens or Canada residents.


Thanks in advance
 

1AurCitizen

Registered Users (C)
#2
The US and Canada track every entry. A passport is not always stamped but CBP/CBSA retain entry and exit records in their respective databases. Did you travel through an airport or a land border?

Keep a personal record of the date(s) to fill in the n400.
 

janv

New Member
#3
Thanks 1AurCitizen for your response and inputs. Yes I have all the dates of all the travels. I travelled through airport. I have the airlines electronic itinerary. But I do not have the CBSA date stamp in the passport.
 

ponyo_rocks

Registered Users (C)
#4
There are a few other types of proof you can keep handy if you are so inclined. This is optional - but I actually derive enjoyment from tasks like this! In fact, I had to collect this info to present to a US embassy when my Green card, passport, boarding pass stubs (& other items) were stolen years ago outside the US. The embassy encouraged us to get creative!

1) copy of boarding pass (unlikely people save this)
2) airline miles activity (this means that you actually boarded the flight and flew those miles). This only works if you did not use airline miles.
3) credit card activity in the US prior to your flight to Canada, preferably from something you purchased at the airport.
4) We actually flew with airline miles when the incident happened, so we went to the airline office and asked them for proof that we boarded the flight and they gave us a copy of our boarding record. o_O
 
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