jobs after green card

Dhinchek

Registered Users (C)
My lawyer suggested that since i got the greencard based on particular job, it is necessary and important that I work at the job after receiving permanent residence and for a reasonable period of time thereafter.

Does any one know how much time (months, years) I need to work at that type of job/same company after GC is approved? Is there a law for this?
 

sfmars

Registered Users (C)
My lawyer suggested that since i got the greencard based on particular job, it is necessary and important that I work at the job after receiving permanent residence and for a reasonable period of time thereafter.

Does any one know how much time (months, years) I need to work at that type of job/same company after GC is approved? Is there a law for this?

The reasonable time is one day.

There is no law. Based on your lawyer's opinion, till you become US citezen (at least 5 years).
 

iamyoohoo

Registered Users (C)
I am not sure what the basis of this 6 months to a year is. I have not heard of any case in which having less than 6 months has caused a problem - have you?

In my case, I've left less than 3 months after the approval. My company was in a bad phase with no funding and low on money and a lot of employees left so I feel that there was a valid reason for me as well. Circumstances can cause people to do things and it really depends on your situation. Obviously the more the better but I don't think 6-12 months is a law of any sort.

My 2 cents ...

The question is often asked. Generally speaking, six months to a year should not be too much of a problem, but it comes down to your appetite for risk.
 

iamyoohoo

Registered Users (C)
Thanks sfmars
However, one day does not seem reasonable by any stretch of imagination.
:)

Why not ? If you can demonstrate that there were circumstances that led you to leave then why not ? Obviously the more the better however as long as you document the cause and have enough backup to your need, ideally you should be able to demonstrate your need to leave.
 

ram0623

Registered Users (C)
i am still waiting on my GC. BUT i know, my friend got is GC 5+ years ago. he moved on, once he got his Card(the same day, literally). now he is citizen (last month), he didnt have any problem. but again, each case is different. personally, I recommend be with the current company for couple of months.again, good luck.
 

TheRealCanadian

Volunteer Moderator
I am not sure what the basis of this 6 months to a year is. I have not heard of any case in which having less than 6 months has caused a problem - have you?

I am not, but again it all comes down to risk - the risk that between now and naturalization, USCIS will come up with some guidelines for this area that may impose a longer requirement than you expected, and you cannot go back and rewrite the past.

If you want to stay for less time and accept the risk, go ahead. Different people will weigh it differently.
 

gcWudBeHere

Registered Users (C)
I am not, but again it all comes down to risk - the risk that between now and naturalization, USCIS will come up with some guidelines for this area that may impose a longer requirement than you expected, and you cannot go back and rewrite the past.

If you want to stay for less time and accept the risk, go ahead. Different people will weigh it differently.

Your statement about risk is very true..

If I were to be in this situation of deciding whether to move to a new job (and would be in that situation very soon), I would certainly take the new / better job, for I am risker... In addition, USCIS does not have clear guidelines about time frames after GC approval. (I can always ask for pardon at a later time.)

There is no saying what guidelines USCIS would come up... Looking into the current state of the economy and mindset of applicants in the immigrant community (to retreat to their respective countries for a better future), I strongly believe gov (and USCIS) would take steps to RETAIN immigrants rather than SHUN them away. In other words, I suspect any steps USCIS would take in this regard would be favorable to immigrant communities.

So, I would be more willing to take that risk today and think of the consequences 5 years later, which is long long away. I cannot be too cautious now only to realize that USCIS has opened gates for every foreigner, a scenario that is not too far fetched.
 

nj_skm

Registered Users (C)
What about leaving before getting the GC? In case of AC21, a lot of applicants are leaving the original sponsoring employer, as long as the job is same or similar.

Some would argue that AC21 would fall into a different category, as that's done under the auspices of the law and the USCIS, but it does muddy the waters a bit.

See the link below for new PR's.
See the second bullet under "Rights".

http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/us...nnel=4f719c7755cb9010VgnVCM10000045f3d6a1RCRD

It does not mention ANYTHING about staying with the sponsoring employer, in case of EB. In fact, it makes no distinction between PR's who got there via the EB, FB, DV or asylum and goes on to mention that they're all under the same status and rights and responsibilities apply equally.
 
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