Is it OK for PRs to purchase and consume marijuana in Colorado now?

cafeconleche

Registered Users (C)
#2
Well, if you buy it in Colorado and don't go nuts in public, you're probably not going to run into the authorities, let alone federal authorities, so you should be ok. I doubt CIS would like it if you're arrested for it.
 

Jackolantern

Registered Users (C)
#3
It's still against Federal law. So if USCIS finds out, it could cause your naturalization to be denied, and you could even deported for it.
 

WBH

Registered Users (C)
#4
It's still against Federal law. So if USCIS finds out, it could cause your naturalization to be denied, and you could even deported for it.
But for that to happen, one has to be convicted in federal court first but I don't see why department of justice (which is not in charge of immigration any more) wants to prosecute non-citizens only in this matter.

If there is no crminal conviction, then it al boils down to Qeustion 22 (a)(b)(c) which does not need cmrinal conviction

(a) habitually drunk
(b) prostitution (leagl in parts of Nevada)
(c) sold or smuggled illegal drugs

If you onlyt but Marijunna in Colorado and consume yourself within that state, you do not even need to answer Yes.
 

Vorpal

Registered Users (C)
#5
Marijuana use is still a federal crime, although the federal government most likely won't prosecute casual smokers. However, they may still have you on the hook if you answer "No" to the "have you ever committed a crime for which you were not arrested?" question. Then again, it's not a crime in Colorado, so consuming marijuana and answering "No" to that question is not lying. The law is still too new to accurately predict any immigration related repercussions.

Here's another interesting example. A woman in California was recently issued a traffic ticket for driving while wearing Google Glass. She pleaded not guilty and is currently awaiting her court date. How will the law treat this new technology?

http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/2013/12/04/google-glass-ticket/3868573/
 
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WBH

Registered Users (C)
#6
Marijuana use is still a federal crime, although the federal government most likely won't prosecute casual smokers. However, they may still have you on the hook if you answer "No" to the "have you ever committed a crime for which you were not arrested?" question. Then again, it's not a crime in Colorado, so consuming marijuana and answering "No" to that question is not lying. The law is still too new to accurately predict any immigration related repercussions.
Well, to be on the safe side, a PR who does want to smoke marihuana in Colorado can purchase no more than 30 grams
each time. The laws says one time offense of singe posession of 30 g or less is not deportable. If one does get convicted,
then he better stop from that time on

http://www.uscis.gov/sites/default/files/ilink/docView/SLB/HTML/SLB/0-0-0-1/0-0-0-29/0-0-0-5684.html

(i) Conviction.-Any alien who at any time after admission has been convicted of a violation of (or a conspiracy or attempt to violate) any law or regulation of a State, the United States, or a foreign country relating to a controlled substance (as defined in section 102 of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 802)), other than a single offense involving possession for one's own use of 30 grams or less of marijuana, is deportable.
 

cafeconleche

Registered Users (C)
#7
I suppose it's better to wait a couple of months to see how the Feds actually react to the (brilliant) situation in Colorado before partaking.
 
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