Green cards for sister and mother of spouse?

My elderly mother-in-law and young sister-in-law live in Myanmar. They have assets. I make a middle-class salary, so money to live on is not really an issue.

I understand this may take 6-10 years. My mother-in-law has stated that she is happy in her home and will refuse to get on the plane. Being that I am planning to bring my young sister-in-law here, I will also go though the process for my mother-in-law. My sister-in-law will not leave her behind, so we will figure out what to do when the time comes. I dread bringing over an elderly woman in a wheelchair shaking her first and arguing with the flight attendants.

For now, I must assume they are both coming. I hope she will come, so she can at least see America before she proceeds to the afterlife. I hope she passes with a smile on her face because she saw the Grand Canyon with her daughters, son-in-law, and grandson. Ok, enough of that.

Anyway, any direction you can give me will help.


Thanx;
 

Sm1smom

Super Moderator
Your wife will need to become a USC first before she can sponsor her mother or her sibling and her spouse. Sponsoring the mother after she (your wife) becomes a USC may take about 2 years from start to finish. Sponsoring her sister and her spouse (as the sister's derivative) may take 15 years or more from start to finish.
 

SusieQQQ

Well-Known Member
You cannot directly sponsor either of them, only your spouse can when he/she becomes a citizen. It will take approx 1-2 years after that from filing to visa for a parent (depending on processing and consulate backlogs). For a sibling it is much longer due to an annual quota on the number of sibling visas available and a queue of around 2m people, currently those getting visas have been waiting around 15 years and it is likely that the wait from now will be even longer.
 
Wow, it is more complicated than I thought. My wife did not plan on becoming a USC because we own real-estate in Myanmar. If she becomes a USC, then she will lose ownership of our condo. Can our son petition his auntie? He is my wife's biological son. His father was blown to bits by an landmine when he was 3, so I adopted him. He will be 18 next year.

We discussed it last night. My mother-in-law hates airplanes. She rather die than get one one. Fortunately she is OK with cars, so she does not mind driving to Thailand for us to come visit her. She rather likes that. We will visit her when COVID is finished in Thailand.
 

SusieQQQ

Well-Known Member
Wow, it is more complicated than I thought. My wife did not plan on becoming a USC because we own real-estate in Myanmar. If she becomes a USC, then she will lose ownership of our condo. Can our son petition his auntie? He is my wife's biological son. His father was blown to bits by an landmine when he was 3, so I adopted him. He will be 18 next year.

We discussed it last night. My mother-in-law hates airplanes. She rather die than get one one. Fortunately she is OK with cars, so she does not mind driving to Thailand for us to come visit her. She rather likes that. We will visit her when COVID is finished in Thailand.
No. Adults (over 21) can only be petitioned by:
- their USC children over 21
- their USC or LPR spouse
- their USC parent
- their LPR parent, if the adult being petitioned is unmarried
- their USC sibling.
This is already a way more generous list of potential sponsors than any other country I can think of.
 
Top