Filling of N-600 form outside the United States

#1
Hello,
I currently reside in Africa. Before I was born, my father had been a citizen of the United States. Judging by what I read on the UCIS website, I am eligible to apply for acquisition of U.S citizenship.
I have three questions to ask.
First, what are the chances that are my form will be accepted?
Secondly, can I file it from the United States?
Thirdly, can I file it despite having never stepped foot in the United States?

P.S my father passed away two years ago and I am currently 21
 

SusieQQQ

Well-Known Member
#2
Your father did not file CRBA for you?
Do you have documentation to prove he met the requirements to pass citizenship on to you?
 

newacct

Well-Known Member
#3
Hello,
I currently reside in Africa. Before I was born, my father had been a citizen of the United States. Judging by what I read on the UCIS website, I am eligible to apply for acquisition of U.S citizenship.
I have three questions to ask.
First, what are the chances that are my form will be accepted?
Secondly, can I file it from the United States?
Thirdly, can I file it despite having never stepped foot in the United States?

P.S my father passed away two years ago and I am currently 21
Were you born in wedlock or out of wedlock? Do you have evidence that your father was physically present in the US before your birth for a cumulative total of 5 years, including 2 years after he turned 14?

Yes, if you meet the conditions in the law for acquring US citizenship from birth, you are already a US citizen, despite never having set foot in the US. You don't necessarily have to file N-600 for a Certificate of Citizenship; you can instead apply for a US passport directly.
 
#4
Were you born in wedlock or out of wedlock? Do you have evidence that your father was physically present in the US before your birth for a cumulative total of 5 years, including 2 years after he turned 14?

Yes, if you meet the conditions in the law for acquring US citizenship from birth, you are already a US citizen, despite never having set foot in the US. You don't necessarily have to file N-600 for a Certificate of Citizenship; you can instead apply for a US passport directly.
I am a legal child of my father. And yes, he was present in the United States even a year before I was born. He even travelled to the United States the year I was born and returned a year later. He spent 35 years in the United States before I was born. New Jersey, Virginia and New York were the states he resided in
 

SusieQQQ

Well-Known Member
#5
I am a legal child of my father. And yes, he was present in the United States even a year before I was born. He even travelled to the United States the year I was born and returned a year later. He spent 35 years in the United States before I was born. New Jersey, Virginia and New York were the states he resided in
All children are legal. there are just different burdens of proof for in and out of wedlock.
Do you have proof of him meeting the required time periods? It’s not enough for you just to say so.
 
#6
All children are legal. there are just different burdens of proof for in and out of wedlock.
Do you have proof of him meeting the required time periods? It’s not enough for you just to say so.
I've got pictures and letters bearing his address and gift cards and business cards. Would that not be enough?
 
#8
Yeah I have a list of companies he worked for. His passport too and certificates he got from the Johns Hopkins University and University of Columbia
 
#9
Were you born in wedlock or out of wedlock? Do you have evidence that your father was physically present in the US before your birth for a cumulative total of 5 years, including 2 years after he turned 14?

Yes, if you meet the conditions in the law for acquring US citizenship from birth, you are already a US citizen, despite never having set foot in the US. You don't necessarily have to file N-600 for a Certificate of Citizenship; you can instead apply for a US passport directly.
I read that you need to have a CRBA before you can get the passport directly. My father never filed that. Which puts me at square one.
 

newacct

Well-Known Member
#10
I read that you need to have a CRBA before you can get the passport directly. My father never filed that. Which puts me at square one.
You don't need to have a CRBA or any other certificate to apply for a US passport. The evidence that your father met the required periods is enough to apply for a passport.
 
#11
Wow! This is great news! As I said before, my father is deceased and I have never stepped foot in the U.S. that won't be a problem if I have these facts on hand?
 

cafeconleche

Registered Users (C)
#12
No the citizenship was passed on when you were born, so the requirements need to have been met when you were born. Your father need not be around if everything is in order (and I am sorry for your loss).
 
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