Filing an EB-1 EA I-140 - can you do without an attorney?

civ2ru

Registered Users (C)
#1
Hello! I would like to ask for advice, if I may. I am considering filing for a green card (I'm on a P1 visa at the moment). My immigration attorney wants around $5,000.00 to prepare the case – besides government filing fees and doctor fees. I can't afford that, so I’ve been entertaining the notion of filing it on my own. All forms are downloadable from uscis.gov, the kind of materials she would need I'll have to collect by myself anyway… If I tried filing on my own, I would only pay the government fees. Also I could do it in stages – first I-140, then I-485, then I-765 or I-131… I guess the question becomes – if my application was to be denied, would that complicate my P1 extension of stay renewal next year (or visa issuance if I should leave the country)? Are there any additional resources to help me file on my own? Or any other, more affordable options of getting professional help? Thank you!
 
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civ2ru

Registered Users (C)
#3
I am a singer/musician. Seems like I qualify for at least 3 of the necessary requirements - can produce many publications with my name in them (including USA Today, Southern Living magazine and 60 Minutes), can get support letters from respected professionals in my field (proving artistic contribution of major significance in my field), and my work has been exhibited/showcased (played numerous concerts, my music used on Animal Channel and an episode of "Alias", a documentary about my band came out on DVD, 2 albums released on a major label). Also have a Grammy nomination - don't know if that would count as a "lesser nationally recognized prize" in my field... Don't have huge commercial success yet or high salary to speak of - hence, my original post. What are my chances?
 
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ChrisV

Registered Users (C)
#5
A quick answer.

You can certainly file yourself and your case looks good. A Grammy nomination will work because it places you in the top of your field (performing singer/musicians). Keep in mind that you have only to prove that you are among that small percentage that raise at the top of your field.

I just quickly checked the Interoffice Memorandum and you would have no problem to be recognized as EB1 EA. You can claim (i), (iii), (v) and (vii).

So, go for it, and if you need help, just ask!

Chris
 

civ2ru

Registered Users (C)
#6
Okay, hold your horses... ChrisV, this is a VERY OLD THREAD that's been pulled up. Since then, I've already been approved and got my GC, details in signature below! (But I do appreciate your willingness to help!) :)

So, to answer my own question - YES.
 
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ChrisV

Registered Users (C)
#7
Cool!

I'm glad to see that indeed it worked well for you.

Funny because I just looked at the signature of the first message and there was nothing there ;) Thought it was new. I better check the date of the postings now :)
 
#8
I am a singer/musician. Seems like I qualify for at least 3 of the necessary requirements - can produce many publications with my name in them (including USA Today, Southern Living magazine and 60 Minutes), can get support letters from respected professionals in my field (proving artistic contribution of major significance in my field), and my work has been exhibited/showcased (played numerous concerts, my music used on Animal Channel and an episode of "Alias", a documentary about my band came out on DVD, 2 albums released on a major label). Also have a Grammy nomination - don't know if that would count as a "lesser nationally recognized prize" in my field... Don't have huge commercial success yet or high salary to speak of - hence, my original post. What are my chances?
Hi,
I wanted to seek your advice about the format for the letter that you sent to USCIS?
Thanks.
 
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