Citizenship make any difference for parents visitor visa?

jsyamala

Registered Users (C)
My inlaws in India were rejected for a second time in Chennai for applying for a visitor visa and are not interested in trying again. My husband is still in process of getting his green card because he has been stuck in name check for over 2 years. The question is, will it make any difference once my husband is finally a citizen in the future? Would they still have to go through that interview process at the consulate?
 
Your husband becoming a citizen, will make it a LOT harder for his parents to obtain a visitor's visa. Because of the high rate of abuse from visitor visas to AOS. (Your husband could petition them for a green card).

They need to overcome the presumption of being an immigrant risk on their own. Your husband becoming a citizen will only make that harder and even then, they still have to go through all of the due processes and protocols at the Consulate.
 

LucyMO

Registered Users (C)
actually, for some of the Former Soviet Union countries, it works the other way. Until the son/daughter gets citizenship, it's pretty difficult to get a tourist visa, but after getting citizenship - it changes.

Of course, it doesn't work like this every time...
 

boatbod

Registered Users (C)
I can't say for certain whether having a USC member of immediate family really makes that much of a difference to issuance of a B visa; last year my mum successfully got one, even though I'[d just got my USC. I think what really counts is being able to prove strong ties to your home country. These days there is so much abuse of the B visa system that I really don't blame consular officials for being stricter.
 

ccordova624

Registered Users (C)
In South America works like this.

If your son or daughter is a USC and you (father or mother of USC) apply for a visitors visa, their chances are very high.

The reason is that if the parents really would like to immigrate to the US they would persue AOS (thru I-130) insteed of applying for a visitors visa. It would only takes them 6months to get their GCs.

So if the parents just want to visit their sons/daughters and they dont want to live in the US, they will prove their non-immigrant intend once they apply for B visa.
 
Green Cards through consular processing DO NOT take 6 months. More like 9-12 months.

It is easier and despicable to apply for a visitor visa (which you get in 3 months) travel to the US and file for AOS.

So, applying for a visitor visa, does NOT prove that you have non-immigrant intent.

ps: I am, from South America.
 

ccordova624

Registered Users (C)
Ok... so 3 months for visitor visa, plus AOS in the US... how many months? 6 months? 7months?

Equal to 9 to 10 months...


Green Cards through consular processing DO NOT take 6 months. More like 9-12 months.

It is easier and despicable to apply for a visitor visa (which you get in 3 months) travel to the US and file for AOS.

So, applying for a visitor visa, does NOT prove that you have non-immigrant intent.

ps: I am, from South America.
 
Get your parents in the US:

CP = 9-12 Months.

B2->AOS = 3 Months. (How long the GC processing does not matter, it is the time for them to arrive to the US).
 

LucyMO

Registered Users (C)
Get your parents in the US:

CP = 9-12 Months.

B2->AOS = 3 Months. (How long the GC processing does not matter, it is the time for them to arrive to the US).
aaa, what about the 90 days they need to wait after entering on B1/2 before they can file for AOS? or is it what you meant?

So, CP = 9-12 months
AOS = 6+ months

Plus, administrative check, if applicable, for both methods.
 
aaa, what about the 90 days they need to wait after entering on B1/2 before they can file for AOS? or is it what you meant?

So, CP = 9-12 months
AOS = 6+ months

Plus, administrative check, if applicable, for both methods.

Most people do not wait 90 days. As they are unaware of the 30-60-90... :rolleyes:
 
Top