Citizenship Interview - Travel to COP

dave_bj

Registered Users (C)
I like the thought of waking up as US Permanent Resident and going to bed as a new US CITIZEN!!!!

I had my interview at 11:30am this morning at the Baltimore Maryland office. I arrived 20 minutes early only carrying the documents listed on my appointment notice (Green Card, Passport, and Appointment Notice). I decided not to go crazy with all the additional documents people talk about on this forum. Unless you know you have specific issues like arrests and criminal records, Tax issues, etc..., I wouldn't sweat too much.

My only area of concern was my trip to my COP. I did return to my COP for a very short trip to visit my father's grave. This was my only trip to COP in 20 years. While over there, I applied and received a national passport because the one I was holding was no longer valid. This, I thought, might be a problem and I was nervous about this.

Well, after all the scary stories I read on here, my asylum officer showed absolutely NO INTEREST in my trip to COP. I had listed it on my application, she asked about it, but was very casual about it. She only opened the first page of the passport to see my identity and never bothered to see the travel stamps on the other pages. I want to calm the nerves of those that are in a similar situation. I no longer believe this is an issue in itself.

The interviews are video taped from beginning to end. I was asked to answer almost every single question I had answered already on my N400 application. There must have been 25 questions back to back. Make sure to review your application before your interview.

She then proceeded with 6 test questions. She had a form that appeared to have been photocopied hundreds of times which suggests to me that they do not change the questions that often. I was asked:

1. What is the supreme Law of the land.
2. What is the capital of my State
3. What is an amendment
4. Who did we fight in World War II
5. What do we show loyalty to when we say the Pledge of allegiance.
6. ?

I passed all questions. She then asked me to read a very simple sentence on a piece of paper. It was very basic English but I forgot what it was. Finally she asked me to write "The White House is in Washington D.C" on a piece of paper and before I knew it is was over.

The big surprise came when she offered me to take the Oath just a couple of hours later, which I accepted (of course). By 4:15pm, it was all other and I was officially a US citizen.

I really want to thank from the bottom of my heart all those that have inspired and supported me through the years. it was a rough road for me and I am very thankful to all the people who have assisted me on here. I wish everyone the best and I am happy to answer any questions.
 
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cafeconleche

Registered Users (C)
Congratulations.

I'd like to point out that even though the ISO interviewing you did not hassle you about your trip to your country of persecution, AND the renewal of your passport IN YOUR COP (can you explain this? Did you travel on an RTD?), many others ARE questioned, so saying that you don't believe this is an issue is disingenuous.
 

dave_bj

Registered Users (C)
Expressing an opinion (read: "I believe") based on my personal experience can never be "disingenuous". You may disagree, but my opinion is what it is.

Thanks.
 
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heriberto84

New Member
Im sure this was great news for you, im really looking forward to the day that I become a US citizen (currently LPR through asylum), I have two more years to go, but it feels like an eternity. I also want to take this moment to ask you if based on your experience, is it safe to go back to the COP if a family member is ill? Both of my grandmas have past away in the last two years, and I did not have the chance to see them again, they were like my mothers to me :( now my mom is suffering from depression, due to the situation, and she's been seen a physiologist for the last year, would you recommend to visit my COP? or would you recommend me to wait until I become US citizen (2 more years), and if I do go, should I travel directly to my COP or should I travel through a 3rd country and then to my COP, I know this might sound like too many questions, but im really concerned about my status, but mainly about my mom, at some point I wouldn't care risking my life for seeing my mom. Please, I need help :(
 

Hass123

New Member
I like the thought of waking up as US Permanent Resident and going to bed as a new US CITIZEN!!!!

I had my interview at 11:30am this morning at the Baltimore Maryland office. I arrived 20 minutes early only carrying the documents listed on my appointment notice (Green Card, Passport, and Appointment Notice). I decided not to go crazy with all the additional documents people talk about on this forum. Unless you know you have specific issues like arrests and criminal records, Tax issues, etc..., I wouldn't sweat too much.

My only area of concern was my trip to my COP. I did return to my COP for a very short trip to visit my father's grave. This was my only trip to COP in 20 years. While over there, I applied and received a national passport because the one I was holding was no longer valid. This, I thought, might be a problem and I was nervous about this.

Well, after all the scary stories I read on here, my asylum officer showed absolutely NO INTEREST in my trip to COP. I had listed it on my application, she asked about it, but was very casual about it. She only opened the first page of the passport to see my identity and never bothered to see the travel stamps on the other pages. I want to calm the nerves of those that are in a similar situation. I no longer believe this is an issue in itself.

The interviews are video taped from beginning to end. I was asked to answer almost every single question I had answered already on my N400 application. There must have been 25 questions back to back. Make sure to review your application before your interview.

She then proceeded with 6 test questions. She had a form that appeared to have been photocopied hundreds of times which suggests to me that they do not change the questions that often. I was asked:

1. What is the supreme Law of the land.
2. What is the capital of my State
3. What is an amendment
4. Who did we fight in World War II
5. What do we show loyalty to when we say the Pledge of allegiance.
6. ?

I passed all questions. She then asked me to read a very simple sentence on a piece of paper. It was very basic English but I forgot what it was. Finally she asked me to write "The White House is in Washington D.C" on a piece of paper and before I knew it is was over.

The big surprise came when she offered me to take the Oath just a couple of hours later, which I accepted (of course). By 4:15pm, it was all other and I was officially a US citizen.

I really want to thank from the bottom of my heart all those that have inspired and supported me through the years. it was a rough road for me and I am very thankful to all the people who have assisted me on here. I wish everyone the best and I am happy to answer any questions.


This post gave me some hope, I travelled to my COP I am super scared right now of my n400 interview
 

lota2013

Active Member
Frankly it all depend on your particular officer. Your interviewer can be fine, trusting or you can also find someone who want to double check every little issue and make it all a big deal. So it's all a question of luck on who you end up with.
Good luck to you all.
 

Hass123

New Member
Frankly it all depend on your particular officer. Your interviewer can be fine, trusting or you can also find someone who want to double check every little issue and make it all a big deal. So it's all a question of luck on who you end up with.
Good luck to you all.
But do you think my case can be denied because of this? I have doctor letter saying my mom got bed ridden. And a notarized letter from me on precautions i took while there.
 

lota2013

Active Member
I am not lawyer (but lawyers can't be 100% sure) so, I can't be certain.
But I would say that if you traveled to COP for some limited time, and have letter from doctor and list of your precautions, I believe you should be fine. So, don't stress too much on this part. Prepare your overall interview. Good luck!
 

Hass123

New Member
I am not lawyer (but lawyers can't be 100% sure) so, I can't be certain.
But I would say that if you traveled to COP for some limited time, and have letter from doctor and list of your precautions, I believe you should be fine. So, don't stress too much on this part. Prepare your overall interview. Good luck!
Thank you so much for you comforting words, I have been very stressed in the past few days. Hoping for the best
 

Fin

Registered Users (C)
There is really no SOP for the adjudicators. They have a lot of leeway for which questions to ask. Some don’t care and some do. It also depends on their mood on that day. It’s unfortunate but true for all immigration applications.
 
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