Child citizenship - Please guide me

Pavan_N

Registered Users (C)
I got GC (myself, wife and daughter) two years back. I want to send my daughter to India for school. What are my options so that she don't loose her status?

1. When me or mywife become citizen, can we file citizenship for my daughter? (My daughter will be 15 years when we are eligible to apply for citizenship)

2. Do we need to take permission from DHS to study in India?

3.Please provide any helpful information about this.
 

Huracan

Registered Users (C)
I was going to get judgmental about sending your daughter to India, but I'll try to restrain myself. Ok, just allow me a little quip. What's wrong with educating your daughter in the country you want to become a citizen?

Now, to your questions, when did you get your GC? Unless your daughter loses her GC because of staying out the country for too long you can get citizenship and get her back here on a trip and go to the post office with your, or better your wife's naturalization certificate and apply for a passport for her. Your daughter and both you and your wife have to be physically present at the post office to apply for the passport.
 

baikal3

Registered Users (C)
I got GC (myself, wife and daughter) two years back. I want to send my daughter to India for school. What are my options so that she don't loose her status?

1. When me or mywife become citizen, can we file citizenship for my daughter? (My daughter will be 15 years when we are eligible to apply for citizenship)

2. Do we need to take permission from DHS to study in India?

3.Please provide any helpful information about this.

Under the Child Citizenship Act, your daughter will automatically become a U.S. citizen at the moment you or your wife gets naturalized, provided at that moment your daughter is under 18 years old and is a permanent U.S. resident (and no separate naturalization application for your daughter will be needed in that case). As Huracan notes, there may be an issue with your daughter's LPR status if you send her off to school in India for several years. Even if she gets a reentry permit, an absence of more than two years is likely to create a problem with her green card status. If your daughter loses her LPR status because of long absences before you get naturalized, you'd need to sponsor her for a green card again. If she gets it before turning 18 and if you are a U.S. citizen by then, she will become a U.S. citizen too. Still you really need to think through the implications of sending your daughter abroad for several years both for her green card and her citizenship.
 

Jackolantern

Registered Users (C)
Under the Child Citizenship Act, your daughter will automatically become a U.S. citizen at the moment you or your wife gets naturalized, provided at that moment your daughter is under 18 years old and is a permanent U.S. resident (and no separate naturalization application for your daughter will be needed in that case).
And she needs to reenter the US and go back into her parent's custody after one of her parents become a citizen. She won't get citizenship staying in India.
 

Jackolantern

Registered Users (C)
I was going to get judgmental about sending your daughter to India, but I'll try to restrain myself. Ok, just allow me a little quip. What's wrong with educating your daughter in the country you want to become a citizen?
Most American public schools stink and there is little or no choice for public schools. I'd also consider sending my child (if I had one) back to my original country for a couple years of schooling, if the schools in my area weren't good and I couldn't afford or didn't want to pay for private school.
 

Pavan_N

Registered Users (C)
I was going to get judgmental about sending your daughter to India, but I'll try to restrain myself. Ok, just allow me a little quip. What's wrong with educating your daughter in the country you want to become a citizen?

Thinking to send my daughter to India for social life and better schooling. The public school system here are not designed well. If they do they don't have these many dropouts. I know the cause of dropouts is for various reasons.

I find here in public schools they don't care about your child performance. They don't have good circulum and let kids enjoy upto 8th grade and load them too much work from 9th and 10th grades.

I my experience I found that kids in their early age have lot of knowlege and enthusiasm to learn. We should encourage them in that age to learn more. This is the foundation for their future learning. They will remember for long time also. Public schools here don't have this concept.
 

nkm-oct23

Registered Users (C)
I have a different opinion of US public schools. I went to school in India where all the emphasis was on rote learning. Here in the US there is more importance to understanding concepts, participating in the classroom discussions and expressing opinions. There is no single point testing until one is in high school whereas in India we had all kinds of tests including a final test that required you to remember everything you learned in that entire year.
My son goes to public school here and I am quite happy with it.
My 1¢
 

Huracan

Registered Users (C)
That's what I find funny, most people come to this country for work, inspired by better wages and better work environment which has to be based on some benefits of the education system. Probably what nkm-oct23 mentions, the emphasis on understanding and doing things, solve problems by themselves, instead of rote memorization. Anyway, thanks Pavan_N for taking the time to answer my question.
 

thankful

Registered Users (C)
I have a different opinion of US public schools. I went to school in India where all the emphasis was on rote learning. Here in the US there is more importance to understanding concepts, participating in the classroom discussions and expressing opinions. There is no single point testing until one is in high school whereas in India we had all kinds of tests including a final test that required you to remember everything you learned in that entire year.
My son goes to public school here and I am quite happy with it.
My 1¢

This is a big country. So the quality of schools ranges across the spectrum. If you as the parent is not satisfied with a particular school, you can move to another district for a better school (which usually entails higher property taxes). Parents with school age children do this all the time in the U.S. This is a far better option than sending your kids overseas where they will out on acculturalization as Americans. That in my opinion could cost them dearly when they become adults.

nkm-oct23, you hit the nail on its head in your description of the American educational system as a whole. The system produces people who have the ability to engage in critical and independent critical thinking and have good public speaking style and good social skills. These will well-serve students for their entire lives.
 
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Jackolantern

Registered Users (C)
This is a big country. So the quality of schools ranges across the spectrum. If you as the parent is not satisfied with a particular school, you can move to another district for a better school (which usually entails higher property taxes). Parents with school age children do this all the time in the U.S. This is a far better option than sending your kids overseas where they will out on acculturalization as Americans. That in my opinion could cost them dearly when they become adults.
I don't know about schools in India, but I know that I'd have to move to a very expensive area (where people have $500K houses) or use private school if my (future, if any) kids are going to get a US high school education as good as I got in the Caribbean.

I wouldn't send them for the whole high school years, but I'd seriously think about sending them to the Caribbean for a couple of years.
 

bashar82

Registered Users (C)
I spent two years in Bangladesh for high school. When I later applied for naturalization, the office agreed that I had maintained my residency through my mother who was still in the States as I was a minor.

Unfortunately, I had to apply in my own right as my mother was naturalized only a few weeks after my 18th birthday.
 
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