Can USCIS take away my green card? I was victim of medical malpractice.

Sal9864

New Member
I was on h1b from 2005 to 2011. In 2011 I got my EAD. I did not work from 2011 to 2014 as due to my sickness due to medical malpractice I was victim of. I could have worked from home but I had enough money and chose not too. I am planning to file lawsuit on the company which did medical malpractice. I went to India to recover in mid 2013 and current there for recovery while I have re-entry permit to come back from USA (re-issued). I started to work in 2014 from home (did 150k in Sales) and still work on my business from home as I continue to recover from my illness though I am not making much money right now. When I will file lawsuit, it's possible my immigration status will be scrutinized again as I became sick during the process of acquiring GC.

Can USCIS determine I was ineligible to receive my GC and can take it away? During time I have been sick, I am fully able to work from home on a job or business. I am experimenting/growing my business as I have enough money saved from years of hardwork to sustain me while I am out of USA.

Please reply so that I can decide whether to file this medical malpactice lawsuit. If it's going harm my immigration status, I may not file it.

Thanks
Sal
 

Bathory

New Member
Anyone can file a lawsuit for malpractice. One does not need to be a citizen, or permanent resident, as many people come for Medical Tourism. Your immigration status is not relevant to the malpractice of a doctor.

That being said, as long as you were completely honest on the forms, and in your interview for your Green Card, they could not retroactively cancel it. Does USCIS know about your time not working, and your time away from the country? This should have come up during the interview, as I believe you are required to submit a travel history.
 

Sal9864

New Member
Anyone can file a lawsuit for malpractice. One does not need to be a citizen, or permanent resident, as many people come for Medical Tourism. Your immigration status is not relevant to the malpractice of a doctor.

That being said, as long as you were completely honest on the forms, and in your interview for your Green Card, they could not retroactively cancel it. Does USCIS know about your time not working, and your time away from the country? This should have come up during the interview, as I believe you are required to submit a travel history.

Thanks for useful comments. Is it possible uscis can claim that I was not in position to work during my application for GC and that's why I was not eligible for GC in first place? I did some work during my illness though and could have worked consistently from home if I wanted but I chose not to. Just trying to find out the risk associated with lawsuit.
 

Bathory

New Member
Thanks for useful comments. Is it possible uscis can claim that I was not in position to work during my application for GC and that's why I was not eligible for GC in first place? I did some work during my illness though and could have worked consistently from home if I wanted but I chose not to. Just trying to find out the risk associated with lawsuit.

I'm not sure why USCIS would be involved in a malpractice lawsuit. Seems irrelevant, as that is not their area. It is a separate issue.

Just because you were authorized to work may not mean that you were required to work.

Permanent Residency is granted for many reasons. If you feel that you have lied, or omitted information from your paperwork and/or interview, that is a separate issue for which you may need to consult an immigration lawyer.
 

Sal9864

New Member
I'm not sure why USCIS would be involved in a malpractice lawsuit. Seems irrelevant, as that is not their area. It is a separate issue.

Just because you were authorized to work may not mean that you were required to work.

Permanent Residency is granted for many reasons. If you feel that you have lied, or omitted information from your paperwork and/or interview, that is a separate issue for which you may need to consult an immigration lawyer.
thanks for suggestion. I don't think I omitted anything from paperwork
 

Sal9864

New Member
thanks for suggestion. I don't think I omitted anything from paperwork
One thing I forgot to mention is that I am expecting a TV documentary based on my malpractice case and troubles and that will highlight how I came to usa, got sick, my struggles to get back to normal life. That documentary can cause a discussion if I violated any immigration laws.
 

1AurCitizen

Registered Users (C)
As the subject matter of a documentary, any potential immigration violations may be scrutinized\exposed. That's the risk of exposure to a wide audience.
 
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