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The "been there done that" thread: life in the US after DV

Discussion in 'Lottery Visas - DV' started by SusieQQQ, Oct 13, 2014.

  1. saabe

    saabe Member

    At least where I live,....if you're overqualified and want to land a job in something "below your level",...tailor you CV according to the job requirements. If it's something that doesn't require degrees, put just "High School Degree". I am sure it's the same in the US. My cousin who has a bachelor degree in Chemistry found a job in just 15 days, although not in his field and much below his level of education (Cashier,...now he's a business owner and doing quite well). Maybe you need to revise your "method" of job-seeking. Here is a tip: Forget about internet if you want an unskilled job (temporarily just to earn some money,...you'll have time to find your dream job once you're settled). You must swallow your pride and ask around. Also take into account that it's harder to find a job in Forensic Science than in IT for example,...I'm sure it's the same thing even in your country.
     
  2. SusieQQQ

    SusieQQQ Well-Known Member

    FYI for those who are to replace green cards ...if lost, stolen or have a child turning 14...
    After an enquiry today we were told that this is one of the things where one service center (in this case, Potomac) covers the entire nation. They are currently processing applications from September 12 2016, so there is an 11 month delay on these.
     
    Sam2015 likes this.
  3. Lucid

    Lucid Active Member

    Wow, that's very long waiting time.
     
  4. Sam2015

    Sam2015 Member

    Yes this is correct, I can see that in the processing time in the service center. We traveled with the old one and no one comment. Thanks for updating us.
     
  5. SusieQQQ

    SusieQQQ Well-Known Member

    This was to replace the 14-year old child's card, correct? Yes, the old card is valid until you receive the new one. We've traveled twice out the country while waiting for the new one and had no problems. We also traveled a few times between when she turned 14 and when we realized :oops: we were supposed to get a new one with no questions being asked. So tbh I'm not sure how essential it really is.... but it's what you're supposed to do so we did it.
     
  6. saabe

    saabe Member

    Hi all. A question for those already living in the US. Is it adviseable to get a degree equivalency through a credential evaluation agency like WES,....or a simple translation is enough for most employers?
     
  7. EmilyW

    EmilyW Well-Known Member

    I didn't get my degrees evaluated and I've had no issues getting interviews.
     
    saabe likes this.
  8. Lucid

    Lucid Active Member

    It's usually necessary if you're planning to enroll for Graduate studies. And even that, most schools accept an original transcript, with a GRE.
     
    saabe likes this.
  9. SusieQQQ

    SusieQQQ Well-Known Member

    Hmm, I don't think there's a "general answer". Depends on your industry and even specific employers, and probably also the country you come from. I imagine degrees from Western Europe or Australia are less likely to need evaluation than those from certain lesser known countries/educational systems. Some employers might give you an offer conditional on a WES or similar evaluation showing its equivalent to a US degree. If you feel you might be at a disadvantage or you find you're not getting any invitations for interview, then it might be worthwhile getting it done.

    As Lucid says, it might be required for graduate studies too - but I know it's not always necessary.
     
    saabe likes this.
  10. LucyTheNerd

    LucyTheNerd New Member

    Depends what sort of degree you're talking about. If it's a professional qualification (medical, nursing, accounting, law, teaching etc) you will almost certainly need to get your credentials evaluated by an independent organisation.

    I'm a licenced physiotherapist in Australia, and obtained my degree from an Australian university. To be eligible for a US licence (and therefore to be allowed to work as a physio in the US) all states require formal evaluation of my Australian credentials. It costs a lot of time and money but it's just what ya gotta do!

    Not sure about whether generalist degrees (arts, science etc) need to be evaluated though, sorry.
     
    saabe likes this.
  11. SusieQQQ

    SusieQQQ Well-Known Member

    You're talking about evaluation in order to get a US license to practice. This is not the same as just taking a job in a field that doesn't require any special US license or further certification etc. People in professions that require US licensing have a number of hoops to jump through, of which evaluation is just one.
     
  12. LucyTheNerd

    LucyTheNerd New Member

    Yes.....I know all this. What I DON'T know is what situation the person who asked this question is in! :-D
     
  13. saabe

    saabe Member

    Thanks for your detailed reply. I'm basically a computer scientist working as a Automation engineer , I don't think I'll need any sort of licencing to get a job in my field. However it would be prudent in my case to get evaluated by a private agency (it only costs 200$),...since I may need to take some courses to adapt my knowledge to local standards and regulations related to my field (which may be different from Europe's).
     
  14. leawe

    leawe Member

    hi all,

    i have question regarding living abroad for GC holders and have to enter US every 6 month

    i remember when i was leaving US there was no exit stamp like the entry stamp

    how will they determine the 6 period duration?

    also do i have to visit the same state when i entered first time or any state considered fine?

    also i dont have my GC with me its with my relatives and when i will be departing the stamped vise will be already expired ( the 6 month from th meical report) i know its mentioned valid for 1 year on it... but im worried in the airport the airlines might makin me a problem

    finally i really need a big huge help regarding taxes for abroad living how its be... im living in a place have no tax and i was trying to understand how its work and how much i have to pay but i couldnt find proper answers for a beginner of this matter
     
  15. SusieQQQ

    SusieQQQ Well-Known Member

    True, but I would personally assume anyone at least at the stage of asking about WES would at least know if they were required to be licensed for practicing in the US, and given the way he phrased the question I thought it obvious he didn't. Anyway... for total newbies reading this thread they'll have all the options now I guess.
     
  16. SusieQQQ

    SusieQQQ Well-Known Member

    Dude. It's not "having to visit" every six months. It's having to live, mostly, in the US. Living abroad and visiting every 6 months is going to lose you your green card at some stage. If you need to be out for a bit at first - get a 2 year re-entry permit.

    Doesn't matter where you live, if you have a green card you are required to file taxes with the IRS. You need to talk to a tax expert but my lay impression would be that if you're not paying tax in your current jurisdiction, you have no tax to offset against a US liability so it will come down to whether your earnings fall below the tax exempt foreign threshold or not. You probably need to bear in mind that even if your green card gets taken away for abandoning residency, or you abandon it, until you've filed a formal relinquishing of it you're still liable to file with the IRS.

    Your entries and exits are all on their computer system btw.
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2017
  17. SusieQQQ

    SusieQQQ Well-Known Member

    If the cost isn't an issue sure get it done. I live in the Bay Area, and there are many, many people with foreign IT and engineering degrees here - whether they have needed evaluation depends on each employer. Some do, some don't. My husband did for their company red tape but his company actually paid for it!
     
  18. leawe

    leawe Member

    Hi @SusieQQQ
    now thats freaked me out!!
    i've been readin in different sites the live in abroad option for GC holders with every 6 month entry .. and the permit you are talking about is for continuously 2 year outside US
    and your are saying i'll loose it bcz of living outside more than living in US
    even though i'll be leaving permanently by next june... but will i be in risk for loosing my GC???
    incase of i lost it what will be the scenario? they wont let me in from the airport and i have to go back? or i have to go to court? ... now im panic
    regarding current situation my stamped visa will be expired... my concern the airline agent they will be scared to let me in bcz i dont have my GC and the visa will be already stamped
     
  19. EmilyW

    EmilyW Well-Known Member

    You should be freaked out. The Green Card is for living in America, not for visiting every so often. Forget the sites you've read. I've given you a link below to the formal government position. I would suggest you read it carefully a few times.

    There is some flexibiltiy in the first year after activation. But, if your plan is to live in your home country and visit every six months, expect trouble. You may end up in front of an immigration court and you will have to prove that you are a resident of the US. Given you would have been living and working overseas, it's not an unreasonable conclusion that you are not using the Green Card for purposes intended and you may lose it. To prove you live here, you need an address, cell phone, employer, filing taxes.

    I would suggest you read up on your obligations as a Lawful Permanent Resident: https://www.uscis.gov/green-card/af...bilities-green-card-holder-permanent-resident

    I'm not sure you entirely understand your obligations.
     
    leawe likes this.
  20. EmilyW

    EmilyW Well-Known Member

    Here is another link for you to read: https://www.uscis.gov/green-card/after-green-card-granted/maintaining-permanent-residence

     

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