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Reporting citizenship to Social Security Administration - How does it benefit?

Discussion in 'Life After Citizenship' started by snappy, Mar 24, 2010.

  1. snappy

    snappy Registered Users (C)

    Hi,

    What are the benefits of reporting citizenship status to the social security administration after naturalization? Assume the last time reported the status was resident alien.

    Thanks.
  2. König

    König Registered Users (C)

    When you get a new job, eVerify will not work for you. Assuming you already have a SS card that does not have "Valid for work with authorisation...".
  3. snappy

    snappy Registered Users (C)

    The verification procedures I'm familiar with, and thanks for reconfirming. I heard that there is also an increase in the benefits, but I cannot seem to find details.
  4. sanjoseaug20

    sanjoseaug20 Registered Users (C)

    There are no increase in benefits. Where did you hear that?
  5. snappy

    snappy Registered Users (C)

    I recall reading an article a long time ago (I no longer have the link) saying that you should report your naturalization status and it will also increase your benefits up to 20% from resident alien. Now this could be blatant misinformation. I don't see any articles mention this, but I've been wondering about it for awhile.
  6. König

    König Registered Users (C)

    AFAIK, this is not true. At least H1B workers earn the same benefits while working in the USA. J1 and F1 do not earn benefits because they are exempt from some taxes, including social security. However, the story with 20% just does not make any sense.
  7. sanjoseaug20

    sanjoseaug20 Registered Users (C)

    The only difference is "whether" you get benefits or not. If you qualify for benefits based on 40 quarters of contributions, you may not get the benefits depending on which country you live in, which country you are a citizen of, whether you retain LPR or no. However, increasing benefits because you took up citizenship - never heard of that.

    Check this for related examples - http://www.ssa.gov/pubs/10035.html

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