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Do I need a N-600 to apply for a passport?

Discussion in 'US Citizenship' started by Sasa92, Aug 7, 2010.

  1. Sasa92

    Sasa92 Registered Users (C)

    I am a immigrant, when both of my parents became naturalized citizens I was under the age of 18. Now I am looking to travel and will be needing a passport for this. Looking at the applying sections it says I need to show proof of citizenship would that mean for me to fill out the N-600 form?

    If this is the case how long do N-600 usually take to process?

    If this is not the case what will I need to send in to prove that I am a citizen?


    - Thank you.
  2. sanjoseaug20

    sanjoseaug20 Registered Users (C)

    N600 takes a long time (6 months would be a good guess).
    To get a passport when claiming naturalization through parents, you need to show
    a) proof your parents naturalized
    b) proof that you entered US legally on a GC ... I presume you have a GC
    c) birth certificate showing relationship
    d) proof that you were legally in their custody and living with them when they naturalized (school records, insurance records). Custody documents only required if there is a dispute between parents (or single/joint custody), but living with them part is required ... you should not be living in 1 continent when they are in another.
  3. Sasa92

    Sasa92 Registered Users (C)



    So I don't need to file a N-600 to have proof of citizenship to get a passport?

    I can just use those what you said?
  4. therms96

    therms96 Registered Users (C)

    The following is from page 2 of DS-11 , the passport application form:

    b. APPLICANTS BORN OUTSIDE THE UNITED STATES: Submit a previous U.S. passport, Certificate of Naturalization, Certificate of Citizenship, Report of Birth
    Abroad, or evidence described below.
    1) If You Claim Citizenship Through Naturalization Of Parent(s): Submit the Certificate(s) of Naturalization of your parent(s), your foreign birth certificate, and proof of your admission to the United States for permanent residence

    http://travel.state.gov/passport/get/get_4855.html
  5. Jackolantern

    Jackolantern Registered Users (C)

    You don't need the N-600 to get a US passport. Get the passport first, then worry about the N-600 sometime later.
  6. Huracan

    Huracan Registered Users (C)

    As Jackolantern has said, you can get the passport first, no need for N-600 to apply for passport. Then you can apply for N-600 (it can actually be done at any time) if you'd like to have a non-expiring proof of citizenship that shows since what day you became a citizen.
  7. Sasa92

    Sasa92 Registered Users (C)

    Okay sweet, but i`m 18 right now and my parents became naturalized when I was 16. Will this be a issue if I send the papers in or will they look at their naturalization papers and see that I was 16 at the time?
  8. Huracan

    Huracan Registered Users (C)

    Yes, they will look at naturalization certificate which has date of naturalization. At most they might ask you to prove that you were in the US at the time they naturalized or at some time after they naturalized and you turned 18. I would start with the documents listed on the passport form and posted by therms96 and then wait to see if Department of State asks you for more documents.
  9. Sasa92

    Sasa92 Registered Users (C)

    Well I kinda need the passport quickly so can if put some kind of a note or something attached to a paper showing that this is proof that I was in the country at the time of their naturalization? If so what kind of thing would prove that I was in the country.
  10. Huracan

    Huracan Registered Users (C)

    You could attach school records, health insurance receipts, things like that. If you have a trip itinerary/airplane ticket you could go to a passport agency (after making an appointment) for a very quick passport. You might go there with whatever proof you have of being in the country at the time your parents naturalized. A simple note won't be enough it has to be some sort of third party document, as I mentioned, school records, health insurance receipts, and things like that.
  11. Sasa92

    Sasa92 Registered Users (C)

    Is it fine if I send a copy of my parents naturalization papers or does it have to be the actual paper it's on and all that.
  12. Jackolantern

    Jackolantern Registered Users (C)

    When applying for the passport, you have to submit their official naturalization certificates, not copies. And you must hand in the certificates (along with the application form and supporting evidence) in person because it is your first US passport. The post office or passport agency will take the naturalization certificates away and return them after the passport is issued.
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 9, 2010
  13. Sasa92

    Sasa92 Registered Users (C)

    Well I wanna thank everyone here that has helped me out, just sent in everything today with the post office they doubled checked up on everything.

    Thanks everyone!
  14. Huracan

    Huracan Registered Users (C)

    Good luck. Consider applying for N-600 once you are done with the passport.
  15. Sasa92

    Sasa92 Registered Users (C)

    Got my passport Book today everything worked out fine.

    :) thanks again everyone.
  16. Jackolantern

    Jackolantern Registered Users (C)

    Excellent!

    Consider also applying for the passport card and/or N-600 so you'll have a backup.
  17. Huracan

    Huracan Registered Users (C)

    Congratulations! :)

    I second Jackolantern's recommendation.
  18. inkedking

    inkedking Registered Users (C)

    Help

    Hey guys, we are going to a similar situation. My girlfriend and I are going to be in Cancun next year. She was also naturalized by her mother before she was 18. She doesn't have a passport and is needing one. We also know she needs a n600 as well but what are the steps in getting a passport for her? I've read all of the above and seem to understand but not sure how to take it into action... Thanks so much!
  19. Jackolantern

    Jackolantern Registered Users (C)

    She'll need her mother's citizenship documents to apply for her US passport.

    But first, give us enough facts to establish if she is actually eligible for a US passport or N-600. Various conditions have to be satisfied, not just being under 18 when a parent becomes a citizen.

    Please start a new thread, with answers to the following questions:

    1. Did she have a green card when she was under 18? Is she still living in the US with the green card?
    2. Was she living in the US with her mother when her mother became a citizen?
    3. Did she turn 18 before Feb. 2001?
    4. When did her mother become a US citizen?
    5. Is she adopted?
    6. If her parents divorced or were never married, did her mother still have legal custody when she (her mother) became a US citizen?
    7. Is her father a US citizen?
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 17, 2012
  20. inkedking

    inkedking Registered Users (C)

    Help 2

    Thanks for the quick response, Jackolantern.

    1. a) She did have a green card when she was under the age of 18 and it's still in our safe. b) She lives with me, so yes.
    2. She moved to the US when she was 2, 1986, so yes.
    3. She turned 18 in 2002.
    4. I believe it was in the mid-late 80's but I'd have to double check that. We have copies of all of her mother's information in the safe.
    5. She's not adopted.
    6. Her mother had legal custody of her when she was a citizen.
    7. Her real father no, step father, yes.

    Hopefully these help you out. I'm excited to see what you say in the next response but I'm praying that this will work out soon. We will be heading to Cancun on a family vacation June 2013 and want to get this done soon. Thanks again!!

    :eek:

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